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Going Dutch: A Pot's Place in the Southern Kitchen

Going Dutch: A Pot's Place in the Southern Kitchen Essay .................... Going Dutch A Pot’s Place in the Southern Kitchen by Rebecca Sharpless A visual image sticks with me: a photograph said to be from Refuge Plantation in Camden County, Georgia. A dark- kinned woman, almost surely a former slave, in a white turban and an immaculate apron covering a floor-ength skirt stands in front of an open- earth fireplace perhaps eight feet wide, filled with cooking gear. The Dutch oven, in the foreground of the photograph, occupies important space on the hearth and in the photo, indicating its prominence in the slave- taffed kitchen. View in kitchen, Refuge Plantation, Satilla River, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, by L.D. Andrew, from old photograph in possession of B.C. Heyward, courtesy of the Library of Congress.   ast year, I bit the bullet, so to speak, and bought two Le Creuset pots that the upscale neighborhood chain calls “Dutch ovens.” After more than thirty years of use by me and at least that many by my Aunt Exa before that, my WearEver aluminum set had become pitted and just about worn out, deserving of a happy retirement in the utility room cabinet. The new pots are gorgeous—a shade of yellow http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Going Dutch: A Pot's Place in the Southern Kitchen

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (3) – Oct 31, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Essay .................... Going Dutch A Pot’s Place in the Southern Kitchen by Rebecca Sharpless A visual image sticks with me: a photograph said to be from Refuge Plantation in Camden County, Georgia. A dark- kinned woman, almost surely a former slave, in a white turban and an immaculate apron covering a floor-ength skirt stands in front of an open- earth fireplace perhaps eight feet wide, filled with cooking gear. The Dutch oven, in the foreground of the photograph, occupies important space on the hearth and in the photo, indicating its prominence in the slave- taffed kitchen. View in kitchen, Refuge Plantation, Satilla River, Woodbine, Camden County, Georgia, by L.D. Andrew, from old photograph in possession of B.C. Heyward, courtesy of the Library of Congress.   ast year, I bit the bullet, so to speak, and bought two Le Creuset pots that the upscale neighborhood chain calls “Dutch ovens.” After more than thirty years of use by me and at least that many by my Aunt Exa before that, my WearEver aluminum set had become pitted and just about worn out, deserving of a happy retirement in the utility room cabinet. The new pots are gorgeous—a shade of yellow

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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