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God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (review)

God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (review) reveals the struggles of these men to enact the public ideal of the priest as father and leader of his fl ock when they were privately plagued by the uncertainty, loneliness, hostility, and physical hardship they met in the missionary fi eld. Separated from the culture and institutional framework of the French Catholic Church, the missionaries cultivated a transnational consciousness and political position that allied them more closely with Rome than was the case for their French colleagues, a dynamic that points as well to an early American Catholic Church less independent of Rome than previous scholarship has asserted. In tension with this transnational aspect was a constellation of powerful domestic exigencies. Pasquier metic- ulously mines both personal correspondence and institutional archives to reveal how the missionaries developed strategies to achieve acceptance by their American fl ocks that were driven by local and regional custom and politics, a practice that ultimately led them to act and argue against Pope Gregory XVI’s 1839 antislavery proclamation, In Supremo Apostolatus. Scholars and advanced students of American religious history will be both enlightened and challenged by this fi ne study. The text suff ers in places from too much dependence on historiographical referencing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

God's Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

reveals the struggles of these men to enact the public ideal of the priest as father and leader of his fl ock when they were privately plagued by the uncertainty, loneliness, hostility, and physical hardship they met in the missionary fi eld. Separated from the culture and institutional framework of the French Catholic Church, the missionaries cultivated a transnational consciousness and political position that allied them more closely with Rome than was the case for their French colleagues, a dynamic that points as well to an early American Catholic Church less independent of Rome than previous scholarship has asserted. In tension with this transnational aspect was a constellation of powerful domestic exigencies. Pasquier metic- ulously mines both personal correspondence and institutional archives to reveal how the missionaries developed strategies to achieve acceptance by their American fl ocks that were driven by local and regional custom and politics, a practice that ultimately led them to act and argue against Pope Gregory XVI’s 1839 antislavery proclamation, In Supremo Apostolatus. Scholars and advanced students of American religious history will be both enlightened and challenged by this fi ne study. The text suff ers in places from too much dependence on historiographical referencing

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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