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German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era by Alison Clark Efford (review)

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era by Alison Clark Efford (review) American medicine. Readers without a comfortable knowledge of Civil War medicine and American medical history may in fact wish to pair this book with other major studies, including Margaret Humphreys’s excellent Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War (2013), as well as classic texts from scholars such as William G. Rothstein and John Harley Warner (among others), in order to grasp the full implications of Devine’s thesis. The endnotes are also required reading, teeming with valu- able information to support a text whose wealth of actors and sources is occasionally confusing. But these minor quibbles are easily overshadowed by Devine’s authori- tative and provocative fi ndings. This is an important—even transforma- tive—study for anyone interested in the Civil War, nineteenth-century American medical history, or the place of science, experiment, and the laboratory in medicine. Scholars of American medicine will now be remiss if they fail to consider the war’s signifi cant infl uence on individual physi- cians and orthodox practice as a whole, and this is Devine’s most exciting achievement. Caroline Lieff ers caroline lieffers is a Ph.D. student in the history of science and medicine at Yale University. German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in the Civil War Era by Alison Clark Efford (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

American medicine. Readers without a comfortable knowledge of Civil War medicine and American medical history may in fact wish to pair this book with other major studies, including Margaret Humphreys’s excellent Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War (2013), as well as classic texts from scholars such as William G. Rothstein and John Harley Warner (among others), in order to grasp the full implications of Devine’s thesis. The endnotes are also required reading, teeming with valu- able information to support a text whose wealth of actors and sources is occasionally confusing. But these minor quibbles are easily overshadowed by Devine’s authori- tative and provocative fi ndings. This is an important—even transforma- tive—study for anyone interested in the Civil War, nineteenth-century American medical history, or the place of science, experiment, and the laboratory in medicine. Scholars of American medicine will now be remiss if they fail to consider the war’s signifi cant infl uence on individual physi- cians and orthodox practice as a whole, and this is Devine’s most exciting achievement. Caroline Lieff ers caroline lieffers is a Ph.D. student in the history of science and medicine at Yale University. German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship in

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 5, 2015

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