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Fugitive Learning through a Teacher Inquiry Group: Urban Educators Humanizing their Classrooms & Themselves

Fugitive Learning through a Teacher Inquiry Group: Urban Educators Humanizing their Classrooms &... Fugitive Learning through a Teacher Inquiry Group: Urban Educators Humanizing their Classrooms & Themselves Oscar Navarro California State University Long Beach College of Education College of Education, ED2-187 1250 Bellflower Blvd Long Beach, CA 90840-2201 [Humanization] is thwarted by injustice, exploitation, oppression, and the vio- lence of the oppressors; it is affirmed by the yearning of the oppressed for freedom and justice, and by their struggle to recover their lost humanity. Dehumanization, which marks not only those whose humanity is stolen, but also (though in a different way) those who have stolen it, is a distortion of the vocation of becoming more fully human (Freire, 2003, p. 43-44). Freire’s (2003) notion of dehumanization provides keen insight to the way schooling in the U.S. not only adversely impacts the learner but also a teacher’s humanity. This process of dehumanization for students (and also for educators) is most obvious when it involves the over-disciplining and punishing of youth of Color in urban schools. Students of Color, especially those with learning disabilities, in foster care, and pov- erty, are subject to disproportionally higher rates of referrals, suspensions, and ex- pulsions that exclude them “from opportunities to learn, and thus punishments” (Noguera, 2003; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Fugitive Learning through a Teacher Inquiry Group: Urban Educators Humanizing their Classrooms & Themselves

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (3) – Dec 18, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Fugitive Learning through a Teacher Inquiry Group: Urban Educators Humanizing their Classrooms & Themselves Oscar Navarro California State University Long Beach College of Education College of Education, ED2-187 1250 Bellflower Blvd Long Beach, CA 90840-2201 [Humanization] is thwarted by injustice, exploitation, oppression, and the vio- lence of the oppressors; it is affirmed by the yearning of the oppressed for freedom and justice, and by their struggle to recover their lost humanity. Dehumanization, which marks not only those whose humanity is stolen, but also (though in a different way) those who have stolen it, is a distortion of the vocation of becoming more fully human (Freire, 2003, p. 43-44). Freire’s (2003) notion of dehumanization provides keen insight to the way schooling in the U.S. not only adversely impacts the learner but also a teacher’s humanity. This process of dehumanization for students (and also for educators) is most obvious when it involves the over-disciplining and punishing of youth of Color in urban schools. Students of Color, especially those with learning disabilities, in foster care, and pov- erty, are subject to disproportionally higher rates of referrals, suspensions, and ex- pulsions that exclude them “from opportunities to learn, and thus punishments” (Noguera, 2003;

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 18, 2020

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