Front Porch

Front Porch The Civil Rights Movement first touched my life about fifty years ago, though I scarcely knew it at the time. We were visiting my father's sisters at the old home place in South Carolina, and were heading home from a lakeside picnic. I was old enough to read and ask questions, but too young to follow current events. As we slowly wheeled out of the parking lot, station wagon crowded with parents, kids, and aunts, I scrutinized the retreating entrance sign from my perch on the back seat. Its big bold letters read "Greenwood County White Park." The park didn't look white to me. Except for the ducks, all I saw were the usual green trees, brown water, and red dirt. This had to be explained. above: The Civil Rights Movement won huge victories, and made enormous differences, but the gains are fragile and progress is incomplete. Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King, 1964, photographed by Herman Hiller, courtesy of the New York World Telegram & Sun Collection at the Library of Congress. "Why do they call it `White Park?'" I demanded. "Why? " Flush with modern theories of childrearing, my parents normally indulged my curiosity, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Center for the Study of the American South
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Civil Rights Movement first touched my life about fifty years ago, though I scarcely knew it at the time. We were visiting my father's sisters at the old home place in South Carolina, and were heading home from a lakeside picnic. I was old enough to read and ask questions, but too young to follow current events. As we slowly wheeled out of the parking lot, station wagon crowded with parents, kids, and aunts, I scrutinized the retreating entrance sign from my perch on the back seat. Its big bold letters read "Greenwood County White Park." The park didn't look white to me. Except for the ducks, all I saw were the usual green trees, brown water, and red dirt. This had to be explained. above: The Civil Rights Movement won huge victories, and made enormous differences, but the gains are fragile and progress is incomplete. Martin Luther King and Coretta Scott King, 1964, photographed by Herman Hiller, courtesy of the New York World Telegram & Sun Collection at the Library of Congress. "Why do they call it `White Park?'" I demanded. "Why? " Flush with modern theories of childrearing, my parents normally indulged my curiosity, but

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 19, 2008

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