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Front Porch

Front Porch The Confederate monuments, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu explained in a historic speech at Gallier College in 2017, “are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, and the terror that it actually stood for.” The mayor called upon the city of New Orleans to create new symbols together, reflective of the possibility and potential of all, rather than the white elite and working-­ lass southerners who remained tied to a particularly toxic understanding of “heritage.” Lee Circle minus the statue of Robert E. Lee, 2017, by Kate Medley. Southern things have been very loud of late. Like a scene from any one of the dystopian television series so popular right now in an anxiety-­ridden America—­imagine a Deep South setting for The Leftovers—“things” are misbehaving. Across the South, a number of iconic southern landscapes and objects are shifting in meaning, and we cannot turn away from those conversations. A low hum has grown into a loud chorus, and even violent protest. Consider the Confederate battle flag lowered from its place of honor on the grounds of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
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Abstract

The Confederate monuments, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu explained in a historic speech at Gallier College in 2017, “are not just stone and metal. They are not just innocent remembrances of a benign history. These monuments purposefully celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy; ignoring the death, ignoring the enslavement, and the terror that it actually stood for.” The mayor called upon the city of New Orleans to create new symbols together, reflective of the possibility and potential of all, rather than the white elite and working-­ lass southerners who remained tied to a particularly toxic understanding of “heritage.” Lee Circle minus the statue of Robert E. Lee, 2017, by Kate Medley. Southern things have been very loud of late. Like a scene from any one of the dystopian television series so popular right now in an anxiety-­ridden America—­imagine a Deep South setting for The Leftovers—“things” are misbehaving. Across the South, a number of iconic southern landscapes and objects are shifting in meaning, and we cannot turn away from those conversations. A low hum has grown into a loud chorus, and even violent protest. Consider the Confederate battle flag lowered from its place of honor on the grounds of the

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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