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Front Porch

Front Porch The copyright holder has denied the Publisher permission to post this image online. Southerners, of all people, should know how hard it is to get over a civil war. The bloodshed and physical destruction have devastating material consequences, and the emotional and cultural damage can be just as severe. Destruction by an alien enemy is hard enough, but suffering inflicted by one's own countrymen, companions in the "imagined community" we call a nation, can inspire the utmost in rage, futility, and despair. Even when the results of a civil war are beneficial, as they obviously were for black southerners, the price paid in ongoing recrimination can be heavy indeed. Remembering what General Sherman called "the hard hand of war," southabove: In "Teaching Gone with the Wind in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam," Mart Stewart explores how Margaret Mitchell (here) authored a global phenomenon that has sold over thirty million copies and that has been issued in nearly two hundred editions in forty countries, including another nation once torn by civil war. Courtesy of the Atlanta History Center. erners also know how recovery happens. Memory becomes selective. The beauties and virtues of the lost society become clearer and more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

The copyright holder has denied the Publisher permission to post this image online. Southerners, of all people, should know how hard it is to get over a civil war. The bloodshed and physical destruction have devastating material consequences, and the emotional and cultural damage can be just as severe. Destruction by an alien enemy is hard enough, but suffering inflicted by one's own countrymen, companions in the "imagined community" we call a nation, can inspire the utmost in rage, futility, and despair. Even when the results of a civil war are beneficial, as they obviously were for black southerners, the price paid in ongoing recrimination can be heavy indeed. Remembering what General Sherman called "the hard hand of war," southabove: In "Teaching Gone with the Wind in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam," Mart Stewart explores how Margaret Mitchell (here) authored a global phenomenon that has sold over thirty million copies and that has been issued in nearly two hundred editions in forty countries, including another nation once torn by civil war. Courtesy of the Atlanta History Center. erners also know how recovery happens. Memory becomes selective. The beauties and virtues of the lost society become clearer and more

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2005

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