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Front Porch

Front Porch Women raise their offering bowls to their foreheads in reverence before giving alms during Lao New Year at Wat Lao Sayaphoum temple in Morganton, North Carolina, 2014. Photograph courtesy of Katy A. Clune, whose essay "Home in a New Place: Making Laos in Morganton" is featured in this issue. Southern Cultures is deeply indebted to photographer Tom Rankin, former director of Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies and current head of Duke's MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts, for serving as guest editor of this special issue. Rankin offers his own reflections on documentary and its meanings so we have omitted a detailed introduction to each piece, but the contents include photo essays, archival analyses, and ethnographic accounts. Tom has also found some deeply reflective discussions of the documentary impulse itself. The ensemble provides a rich sample of current documentary efforts to make the South perceptible, both to other people and itself. As you explore these field reports from the land of modern documentary, you'll probably notice that most of the authors realize that the supposed distinction between "biased" storytelling and "authentic" documentary doesn't hold up. First, facts and images alone may not be meaningful without fair but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Front Porch

Southern Cultures , Volume 22 (1) – Feb 28, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Women raise their offering bowls to their foreheads in reverence before giving alms during Lao New Year at Wat Lao Sayaphoum temple in Morganton, North Carolina, 2014. Photograph courtesy of Katy A. Clune, whose essay "Home in a New Place: Making Laos in Morganton" is featured in this issue. Southern Cultures is deeply indebted to photographer Tom Rankin, former director of Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies and current head of Duke's MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts, for serving as guest editor of this special issue. Rankin offers his own reflections on documentary and its meanings so we have omitted a detailed introduction to each piece, but the contents include photo essays, archival analyses, and ethnographic accounts. Tom has also found some deeply reflective discussions of the documentary impulse itself. The ensemble provides a rich sample of current documentary efforts to make the South perceptible, both to other people and itself. As you explore these field reports from the land of modern documentary, you'll probably notice that most of the authors realize that the supposed distinction between "biased" storytelling and "authentic" documentary doesn't hold up. First, facts and images alone may not be meaningful without fair but

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 28, 2016

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