Front Porch

Front Porch It's possible to argue that traditional southern identities were all invented by aggressive regional nostalgia. The very title of Gone with the Wind speaks volumes about its message. And think about "Dixie," the once-more embattled marching song that has cheered Confederate soldiers, high school football teams, segregationist demonstrators, and lovers of rousing tunes generally. The singer is actually not in the land of cotton, but he wants to be. And all because of the old times there. It's been seriously suggested that "Dixie" was actually composed by a family of black musicians, but most authorities point to Dan D. Emmett, a white minstrel show performer of the 1850s. Both accounts agree that the author of "Dixie" actually came from Ohio, which just goes to show how nostalgia can flourish at a certain distance. above: Larry Powell wonders whether Georgia's Dixie Walker has been unfairly omitted from the Baseball Hall of Fame in "Jackie Robinson and Dixie Walker: Myths of the Southern Baseball Player." From The Jackie Robinson Story, an Eagle Lion Film, ©1950. All Rights Reserved. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. And "Dixie" is just a starting point for southern nostalgia. In recent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It's possible to argue that traditional southern identities were all invented by aggressive regional nostalgia. The very title of Gone with the Wind speaks volumes about its message. And think about "Dixie," the once-more embattled marching song that has cheered Confederate soldiers, high school football teams, segregationist demonstrators, and lovers of rousing tunes generally. The singer is actually not in the land of cotton, but he wants to be. And all because of the old times there. It's been seriously suggested that "Dixie" was actually composed by a family of black musicians, but most authorities point to Dan D. Emmett, a white minstrel show performer of the 1850s. Both accounts agree that the author of "Dixie" actually came from Ohio, which just goes to show how nostalgia can flourish at a certain distance. above: Larry Powell wonders whether Georgia's Dixie Walker has been unfairly omitted from the Baseball Hall of Fame in "Jackie Robinson and Dixie Walker: Myths of the Southern Baseball Player." From The Jackie Robinson Story, an Eagle Lion Film, ©1950. All Rights Reserved. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. And "Dixie" is just a starting point for southern nostalgia. In recent

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 5, 2002

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