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front porch Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore , by Baxter Miller. Penny Hooper, Smyrna: “People don’t like to talk about climate change but everybody knows what adaptations we have made . . . We’ve taken it in our stride, as people Down East tend to do, in terms of understanding this is what we’re dealing with.” We’re going coastal in this issue. Coastal food politics, cultures, and economies have always been a complicated mélange of people competing to utilize changing lands, waters, plants, wildlife, fish, and climates. Defining—and sometimes divi- sive—issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity undergird all histories an - d nar ratives in the South, and so it goes with our region’s evolving coastal foodways. A talented collection of writers and documentarians explore these issues in the pages that follow. A critical theme that these essays reinforce is the volatility— and vulnerability—of traditional seafood and fishing industries and cultures in the American South. For the past several years, I have led a seminar on North Carolina’s food cul- tures. My students and I have been privileged to learn from coastal leaders whose passions are focused on educating North Carolinians about their coastal food re- Front Porch 1 sources. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore , by Baxter Miller. Penny Hooper, Smyrna: “People don’t like to talk about climate change but everybody knows what adaptations we have made . . . We’ve taken it in our stride, as people Down East tend to do, in terms of understanding this is what we’re dealing with.” We’re going coastal in this issue. Coastal food politics, cultures, and economies have always been a complicated mélange of people competing to utilize changing lands, waters, plants, wildlife, fish, and climates. Defining—and sometimes divi- sive—issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity undergird all histories an - d nar ratives in the South, and so it goes with our region’s evolving coastal foodways. A talented collection of writers and documentarians explore these issues in the pages that follow. A critical theme that these essays reinforce is the volatility— and vulnerability—of traditional seafood and fishing industries and cultures in the American South. For the past several years, I have led a seminar on North Carolina’s food cul- tures. My students and I have been privileged to learn from coastal leaders whose passions are focused on educating North Carolinians about their coastal food re- Front Porch 1 sources.

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Apr 7, 2018

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