Front Porch

Front Porch The copyright holder has denied the Publisher permission to post this image online. Is the South one place or many? Agreement is hard to find on this old chestnut, and you can almost always start an argument about southern unity versus diversity. On the diversity side, Chapel Hill sociologist Rupert Vance pointed out rather ponderously back in 1932 that the South "holds within its bounds many physiographic areas and many human regions," and insisted that "the physical regions are thus correlated with forms of economy, of social organization--in short, of culture." As a result, Vance concluded, "the South is not one region but many," and went on to catalogue them all in his celebrated Human Geography of the South (University of North Carolina Press, 1932). Journalist W. J. Cash took the opposite tack. Nine years after Vance's magnum above: Sarah Wilkerson-Freeman's "Fat Tuesday at Dixie's" reveals striking photographs, never published before, taken by Jack Robinson in the French Quarter in the 1950s. Photograph courtesy of the Jack Robinson Gallery in Memphis, Tennessee. opus, Cash came out with his own classic, The Mind of the South (Knopf, 1941). Cash admitted the South's superficial diversity but insisted on its fundamental http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The copyright holder has denied the Publisher permission to post this image online. Is the South one place or many? Agreement is hard to find on this old chestnut, and you can almost always start an argument about southern unity versus diversity. On the diversity side, Chapel Hill sociologist Rupert Vance pointed out rather ponderously back in 1932 that the South "holds within its bounds many physiographic areas and many human regions," and insisted that "the physical regions are thus correlated with forms of economy, of social organization--in short, of culture." As a result, Vance concluded, "the South is not one region but many," and went on to catalogue them all in his celebrated Human Geography of the South (University of North Carolina Press, 1932). Journalist W. J. Cash took the opposite tack. Nine years after Vance's magnum above: Sarah Wilkerson-Freeman's "Fat Tuesday at Dixie's" reveals striking photographs, never published before, taken by Jack Robinson in the French Quarter in the 1950s. Photograph courtesy of the Jack Robinson Gallery in Memphis, Tennessee. opus, Cash came out with his own classic, The Mind of the South (Knopf, 1941). Cash admitted the South's superficial diversity but insisted on its fundamental

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 3, 2006

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