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From the Editorial Board

From the Editorial Board Zan Crowder macrowde@email.unc.edu The authors of a recently released Thomas B. Fordham Institute study found that large numbers of elementary, middle grades, and secondary teachers were not assigning reading texts to students with the appropriate grade level complexity. In their preliminary exploration of the implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/Language Arts, the researchers surveyed 484 high school teachers with questions designed to provide insight into teachers’ adoption of the CCSS requirement for “regular practice for grade appropriate texts, regard- less of the independent or instructional reading level of the student” (Shanahan & Duffett, 2013, p.16). After analyzing the survey response data, the authors found that “many teachers have not yet confronted the new text complexity demands of the Common Core… [E]ven in high school relatively large proportions of students were assigned texts based mainly on their current reading levels” (p. 22). In other words, teachers are still assigning texts that correspond to a student’s present ability rather than choosing texts that are beyond that student’s comfort level but which meet CCSS criteria. The Fordham study makes clear that in order to be in compliance with the new set of standards, teachers in the English/Language Arts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

From the Editorial Board

The High School Journal , Volume 97 (2) – Jan 25, 2014

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Zan Crowder macrowde@email.unc.edu The authors of a recently released Thomas B. Fordham Institute study found that large numbers of elementary, middle grades, and secondary teachers were not assigning reading texts to students with the appropriate grade level complexity. In their preliminary exploration of the implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English/Language Arts, the researchers surveyed 484 high school teachers with questions designed to provide insight into teachers’ adoption of the CCSS requirement for “regular practice for grade appropriate texts, regard- less of the independent or instructional reading level of the student” (Shanahan & Duffett, 2013, p.16). After analyzing the survey response data, the authors found that “many teachers have not yet confronted the new text complexity demands of the Common Core… [E]ven in high school relatively large proportions of students were assigned texts based mainly on their current reading levels” (p. 22). In other words, teachers are still assigning texts that correspond to a student’s present ability rather than choosing texts that are beyond that student’s comfort level but which meet CCSS criteria. The Fordham study makes clear that in order to be in compliance with the new set of standards, teachers in the English/Language Arts

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 25, 2014

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