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From the Editorial Board Virtual Charter Schools: Where Did All The Children Go?

From the Editorial Board Virtual Charter Schools: Where Did All The Children Go? From the Editorial Board Virtual Charter Schools: Where Did All The Children Go? Sarah Byrne Bausell Over the last decade, parents and students seeking a more flexible and individu- alized educational experience have increasingly turned to virtual public charter schools, the newest trend in an age old U.S. debate about school choice (O’Hanlon, 2012). Though the school choice movement emanates from what Alan Wolfe (2009) noted as “the right end of the political spectrum” (p.34),schoolchoice(andall of its more recent mutations) has enjoyed bipartisan nurturance, rooted in a collec- tive commitment to a consumer choice ideology and supported by a steady stream of model bills manufactured by assertive school choice lobbyists. Most notably, the Virtual Public Schools Act (2011), a model bill introduced by the conservative free market collective called the American Legislative Exchange Council, ensured that cyber public schools in Tennessee would be “provided equitable treatment and resourcesasany other public school” (Underwood & Mead, 2012). The model bill has since been passed in numerous states. As a result virtual charter schools typi- cally receive the same spending per pupil as a brick and mortar charter, despite not having any expenditure for food service, facilities, or transportation (Saul, 2011). It http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

From the Editorial Board Virtual Charter Schools: Where Did All The Children Go?

The High School Journal , Volume 99 (2) – Jan 24, 2016

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

From the Editorial Board Virtual Charter Schools: Where Did All The Children Go? Sarah Byrne Bausell Over the last decade, parents and students seeking a more flexible and individu- alized educational experience have increasingly turned to virtual public charter schools, the newest trend in an age old U.S. debate about school choice (O’Hanlon, 2012). Though the school choice movement emanates from what Alan Wolfe (2009) noted as “the right end of the political spectrum” (p.34),schoolchoice(andall of its more recent mutations) has enjoyed bipartisan nurturance, rooted in a collec- tive commitment to a consumer choice ideology and supported by a steady stream of model bills manufactured by assertive school choice lobbyists. Most notably, the Virtual Public Schools Act (2011), a model bill introduced by the conservative free market collective called the American Legislative Exchange Council, ensured that cyber public schools in Tennessee would be “provided equitable treatment and resourcesasany other public school” (Underwood & Mead, 2012). The model bill has since been passed in numerous states. As a result virtual charter schools typi- cally receive the same spending per pupil as a brick and mortar charter, despite not having any expenditure for food service, facilities, or transportation (Saul, 2011). It

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 24, 2016

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