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From the Editorial Board: Using Quantitative Methods to Answer Critical Questions

From the Editorial Board: Using Quantitative Methods to Answer Critical Questions From the Editorial Board: Using Quantitative Methods to Answer Critical Questions Caitlin E. Kearney On September 12, 2019, during a debate among Democratic presidential hopefuls, Kamala Harris cited a study on teacher-student race matching. If a Black child has one Black teacher by the end of third grade, the study found, they are 13% more likely to go to college; if that child has two Black teachers before the end of third grade, they are 32% more likely to attend college (Gershenson et al, 2018). Harris cited these statistics to highlight the need for investment in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their teacher training programs. In an instant, an academic study of Black teachers reached an audience of millions and, in doing so, Harris proved the power of quantitative methods in shaping a policy debate. One measure of the impact of academic research, although imperfect, is the salience of findings in policy debates. In riding the wave of the evidence-based policy move- ment, rigorous quantitative studies are often prioritized over qualitative studies. In practice, qualitative and quantitative methodologies often work together in a given subfield. Decades of qualitative literature on the impacts of Black teachers — and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

From the Editorial Board: Using Quantitative Methods to Answer Critical Questions

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (4) – Feb 11, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

From the Editorial Board: Using Quantitative Methods to Answer Critical Questions Caitlin E. Kearney On September 12, 2019, during a debate among Democratic presidential hopefuls, Kamala Harris cited a study on teacher-student race matching. If a Black child has one Black teacher by the end of third grade, the study found, they are 13% more likely to go to college; if that child has two Black teachers before the end of third grade, they are 32% more likely to attend college (Gershenson et al, 2018). Harris cited these statistics to highlight the need for investment in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their teacher training programs. In an instant, an academic study of Black teachers reached an audience of millions and, in doing so, Harris proved the power of quantitative methods in shaping a policy debate. One measure of the impact of academic research, although imperfect, is the salience of findings in policy debates. In riding the wave of the evidence-based policy move- ment, rigorous quantitative studies are often prioritized over qualitative studies. In practice, qualitative and quantitative methodologies often work together in a given subfield. Decades of qualitative literature on the impacts of Black teachers — and

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 11, 2021

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