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From the Editorial Board: Tangled Discrimination in Schools: Binding Hair to Control Student Identity

From the Editorial Board: Tangled Discrimination in Schools: Binding Hair to Control Student... From the Editorial Board: Tangled Discrimination in Schools: Binding Hair to Control Student Identity Torrie K. Edwards School discipline policy is not implemented equitably in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (2014), Black students represent 16% of the student population, but represent 32-42% of students suspended or expelled; in contrast, White students make up over half of the student population, and yet only 31-40% of White students are suspended (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). In total, Black students are suspended and expelled more frequently than their White peers; only 4.6% of White students are suspended, while 16.4% of Black stu- dents are suspended. The U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (2014) not only reports on racial disproportionality in discipline policy implementation, but also gender disproportionality. For example, its data show that boys make up nearly three of every four students suspended or expelled; additionally, although students with disabilities only make up 12% of student enrollment, they are subject to 25% of school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Significant literature has ex- plored the broad impacts of discipline policy disproportionality on students of color (e.g., lost instructional time, school-to-prison http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

From the Editorial Board: Tangled Discrimination in Schools: Binding Hair to Control Student Identity

The High School Journal , Volume 103 (2) – Aug 6, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

From the Editorial Board: Tangled Discrimination in Schools: Binding Hair to Control Student Identity Torrie K. Edwards School discipline policy is not implemented equitably in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (2014), Black students represent 16% of the student population, but represent 32-42% of students suspended or expelled; in contrast, White students make up over half of the student population, and yet only 31-40% of White students are suspended (U.S. Department of Education, 2014). In total, Black students are suspended and expelled more frequently than their White peers; only 4.6% of White students are suspended, while 16.4% of Black stu- dents are suspended. The U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (2014) not only reports on racial disproportionality in discipline policy implementation, but also gender disproportionality. For example, its data show that boys make up nearly three of every four students suspended or expelled; additionally, although students with disabilities only make up 12% of student enrollment, they are subject to 25% of school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement. Significant literature has ex- plored the broad impacts of discipline policy disproportionality on students of color (e.g., lost instructional time, school-to-prison

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 6, 2020

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