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From the Editorial Board

From the Editorial Board Scott Morrison scmo@live.unc.edu Katie Caprino kcaprino@live.unc.edu Recently, The New York Times ran a series of editorials that included multiple views on a variety of educational issues with implications for the nation in general and the Big Apple in particular. Various writers argued in favor of an accountability policy that favors charters, teacher evaluations, and the closure of failing schools (Canada, 2013), a coordination of services to support families, communities, and schools (Noguera, 2013), an implementation of the Common Core State Standards without a focus on value-added teacher evaluations (Stern, 2013), and a comprehensive school system that focuses on the educational and personal needs of students and abandons a reliance on a testing culture (Ravitch, 2013). While the New York City mayoral race has brought media attention to its issues of educational philosophy and policy, North Carolina, the home of The High School Journal, has also drawn coverage, generated by legislative decisions affecting its teachers, students, and communities. In addition to ending unemployment benefits and imposing voter identification requirements, North Carolina legislators significantly cut back on spending for public schools. The Editorial Board (2013) of The New York Times lamented these actions, accusing the Republican-controlled state government of “tearing down http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

Scott Morrison scmo@live.unc.edu Katie Caprino kcaprino@live.unc.edu Recently, The New York Times ran a series of editorials that included multiple views on a variety of educational issues with implications for the nation in general and the Big Apple in particular. Various writers argued in favor of an accountability policy that favors charters, teacher evaluations, and the closure of failing schools (Canada, 2013), a coordination of services to support families, communities, and schools (Noguera, 2013), an implementation of the Common Core State Standards without a focus on value-added teacher evaluations (Stern, 2013), and a comprehensive school system that focuses on the educational and personal needs of students and abandons a reliance on a testing culture (Ravitch, 2013). While the New York City mayoral race has brought media attention to its issues of educational philosophy and policy, North Carolina, the home of The High School Journal, has also drawn coverage, generated by legislative decisions affecting its teachers, students, and communities. In addition to ending unemployment benefits and imposing voter identification requirements, North Carolina legislators significantly cut back on spending for public schools. The Editorial Board (2013) of The New York Times lamented these actions, accusing the Republican-controlled state government of “tearing down

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 14, 2013

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