Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

From the Editorial Board: Free Thought or the Absence of Thought? Critical Media Literacy in the Age of Social Media

From the Editorial Board: Free Thought or the Absence of Thought? Critical Media Literacy in the... From the Editorial Board: Free Thought or the Absence of Thought? Critical Media Literacy in the Age of Social Media Torri Staton University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill tstaton@email.unc.edu In an age when people have access to so many current and historical perspectives on a wide range of topics, many scholars agree that everyone needs to be able to analyze what they take in. Critical literacy scholars have argued for many years for critical analysis of texts that move beneath the surface of the words themselves to consider perspectives and power structures embedded within and around the text. Critical literacy invites a reader first to understand how it is that texts perpetuate systems of oppression and suppression and then move to identify ways of disrupting the status quo through direct or indirect response to text and/or author (Luke, 2000, 2012; Comber, 1993; Knobel & Healey, 1998). Critical media literacy applies the ideals of critical literacy to discussions of popular culture and media. Many phenomena, including cultural phenomena, political shifts, historical narratives and predictions of the future have been represented and documented in popular culture and media. Media takes a variety of form—film, television, art, books, news, and most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

From the Editorial Board: Free Thought or the Absence of Thought? Critical Media Literacy in the Age of Social Media

The High School Journal , Volume 101 (4) – Dec 8, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/from-the-editorial-board-free-thought-or-the-absence-of-thought-V3jZOy4TSZ
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157

Abstract

From the Editorial Board: Free Thought or the Absence of Thought? Critical Media Literacy in the Age of Social Media Torri Staton University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill tstaton@email.unc.edu In an age when people have access to so many current and historical perspectives on a wide range of topics, many scholars agree that everyone needs to be able to analyze what they take in. Critical literacy scholars have argued for many years for critical analysis of texts that move beneath the surface of the words themselves to consider perspectives and power structures embedded within and around the text. Critical literacy invites a reader first to understand how it is that texts perpetuate systems of oppression and suppression and then move to identify ways of disrupting the status quo through direct or indirect response to text and/or author (Luke, 2000, 2012; Comber, 1993; Knobel & Healey, 1998). Critical media literacy applies the ideals of critical literacy to discussions of popular culture and media. Many phenomena, including cultural phenomena, political shifts, historical narratives and predictions of the future have been represented and documented in popular culture and media. Media takes a variety of form—film, television, art, books, news, and most

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Dec 8, 2018

There are no references for this article.