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From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880 (review)

From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880... Reviews497 and 1 very often feel blue, and about twice in a while I go to the doggery and git blue, and then 1 look up at the blue cerulean heavens and sing the melancholy chorus of the Blue-tailed fly. I'm doin' my durndest to harmonize, and think I could succeed if it wasn't for sum things. That's a long excerpt, but a grand one, full of rage and pride and (yet) humor, its dialect striking just the right tone. I'd never heard it before I read this book, and now I'll never forget it. "Being humorous in the South," says Roy Blount, "is like being motorized in Los Angeles or argumentative in New York--humorous is not generally a whole calling in and of itself, it's just something that you're in trouble if you aren't." Well, Roy is, by nature and by calling--in magazines, on the air, in his books, and now in this wonderful vigorous collection, which should displace all those other fat, dated Yankee anthologies of humor, especially in the hearts of southerners. I'm sure that Roy Blount's Book ofSouthern Humor will lead people to mistake him for an Expert on Southernness and Humorousness, and I'm http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South: Central Georgia, 1800-1880 (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 1 (4) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Reviews497 and 1 very often feel blue, and about twice in a while I go to the doggery and git blue, and then 1 look up at the blue cerulean heavens and sing the melancholy chorus of the Blue-tailed fly. I'm doin' my durndest to harmonize, and think I could succeed if it wasn't for sum things. That's a long excerpt, but a grand one, full of rage and pride and (yet) humor, its dialect striking just the right tone. I'd never heard it before I read this book, and now I'll never forget it. "Being humorous in the South," says Roy Blount, "is like being motorized in Los Angeles or argumentative in New York--humorous is not generally a whole calling in and of itself, it's just something that you're in trouble if you aren't." Well, Roy is, by nature and by calling--in magazines, on the air, in his books, and now in this wonderful vigorous collection, which should displace all those other fat, dated Yankee anthologies of humor, especially in the hearts of southerners. I'm sure that Roy Blount's Book ofSouthern Humor will lead people to mistake him for an Expert on Southernness and Humorousness, and I'm

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

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