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Freedom on the Border: The Seminole Maroons in Florida, the Indian Territory, Coahuila, and Texas (review)

Freedom on the Border: The Seminole Maroons in Florida, the Indian Territory, Coahuila, and Texas... Reviews499 Reconstruction, on the other hand, witnessed the emergence of capitalist relations in the plantation order of central Georgia. Planters were unwittingly transforming themselves into an agrarian bourgeoisie by supporting such capitalistic notions as private property and the sanctity of labor contracts. The vicissitudes of the postwar cotton economy and the repressive measures of white planters made freedpeople into rural proletarians. Reidy's book reflects the strengths and weaknesses of a Marxist interpretation of nineteenth-century southern history. The work provides an analytical framework that is comprehensive and highly persuasive. It makes well-informed and meaningful comparisons to other post-emancipation societies such as nineteenth-century Brazil, Cuba, and Russia. Yet the emphasis on relations of production and class conflict does not fully explain the cultural dynamics of southern slave society. The issue of institutions is a case in point. Undoubtedly, as Reidy claims, planter interest strongly colored the churches and academies of antebellum central Georgia. Education and local government became arenas of con- flict between whites of different classes. But institutions possess an internal dynamic and independent agency of their own and can be used as effective bulwarks against oppression, as evidenced by the black schools and churches during Reconstruction. The problems http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Freedom on the Border: The Seminole Maroons in Florida, the Indian Territory, Coahuila, and Texas (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 1 (4) – Jan 4, 1995

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews499 Reconstruction, on the other hand, witnessed the emergence of capitalist relations in the plantation order of central Georgia. Planters were unwittingly transforming themselves into an agrarian bourgeoisie by supporting such capitalistic notions as private property and the sanctity of labor contracts. The vicissitudes of the postwar cotton economy and the repressive measures of white planters made freedpeople into rural proletarians. Reidy's book reflects the strengths and weaknesses of a Marxist interpretation of nineteenth-century southern history. The work provides an analytical framework that is comprehensive and highly persuasive. It makes well-informed and meaningful comparisons to other post-emancipation societies such as nineteenth-century Brazil, Cuba, and Russia. Yet the emphasis on relations of production and class conflict does not fully explain the cultural dynamics of southern slave society. The issue of institutions is a case in point. Undoubtedly, as Reidy claims, planter interest strongly colored the churches and academies of antebellum central Georgia. Education and local government became arenas of con- flict between whites of different classes. But institutions possess an internal dynamic and independent agency of their own and can be used as effective bulwarks against oppression, as evidenced by the black schools and churches during Reconstruction. The problems

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1995

There are no references for this article.