Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Story of Capitalism and Slavery in the Age of Jackson by Joshua D. Rothman (review)

Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Story of Capitalism and Slavery in the Age of Jackson by Joshua... erroneous. He estimates that "in all probability no more than a few dozen maroons died in the American destruction of the fort" and that official accounts exaggerated the number to assuage politicians and anxious southern slaveholders (144). The survivors, in far greater numbers than acknowledged, fled eastward through the peninsula first to the region of today's Tallahassee, then to the Suwannee River, and, ultimately, to the Angola settlement on the Manatee River. Following the latter's 1821 destruction, seemingly also on Andrew Jackson's orders, the final cohort of survivors departed for Andros Island in the Bahamas, or else into the Florida peninsular, where, a decade and a half later, they helped to ignite and fight the Second Seminole War. This book is packed with information and, accordingly, is sometimes slow and difficult reading. It also contains a limited number of minor factual errors, mostly of geography (e.g., Prospect Bluff is west, not "south," of Tallahassee [1]), and occasional resorts to hyperbole. None of this takes away from the fact that the book stands out as a major step forward in the historiography of Florida and the South. Canter Brown Jr. canter brown jr. is a professor of history at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Flush Times and Fever Dreams: A Story of Capitalism and Slavery in the Age of Jackson by Joshua D. Rothman (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/flush-times-and-fever-dreams-a-story-of-capitalism-and-slavery-in-the-ojuGje0KX1
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

erroneous. He estimates that "in all probability no more than a few dozen maroons died in the American destruction of the fort" and that official accounts exaggerated the number to assuage politicians and anxious southern slaveholders (144). The survivors, in far greater numbers than acknowledged, fled eastward through the peninsula first to the region of today's Tallahassee, then to the Suwannee River, and, ultimately, to the Angola settlement on the Manatee River. Following the latter's 1821 destruction, seemingly also on Andrew Jackson's orders, the final cohort of survivors departed for Andros Island in the Bahamas, or else into the Florida peninsular, where, a decade and a half later, they helped to ignite and fight the Second Seminole War. This book is packed with information and, accordingly, is sometimes slow and difficult reading. It also contains a limited number of minor factual errors, mostly of geography (e.g., Prospect Bluff is west, not "south," of Tallahassee [1]), and occasional resorts to hyperbole. None of this takes away from the fact that the book stands out as a major step forward in the historiography of Florida and the South. Canter Brown Jr. canter brown jr. is a professor of history at

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 9, 2014

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off