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Fathers on the Frontier: French Missionaries and the Roman Catholic Priesthood in the United States, 1789-1870 (review)

Fathers on the Frontier: French Missionaries and the Roman Catholic Priesthood in the United... At the same time, they move the content and style of southern humor into more universal realms of psychological escape, literary subversion, and masculine identity. Southern humor, they argue, was "transgressive." It's an elastic term that describes this humor's challenge to genteel culture, literary romanticism, polite language, and traditional notions of race and gender. Sexual propriety? Bring seduction and bodily functions into the open. Byronic heroics? Introduce the con man or the bear-rassler. Decorum and gentility? Respond with brag and boast. High-flown oratory? Cuss, openly. One senses that southern men needed these alter egos as avenues of masculine escapism, and that has been the analytic trend in humor studies for some time. Still, southern humor is and was tied to a place, and the Old Southwest was a particularly charged environment. If the need for masculine escape was strong, so was the pull of status and gentility. Recent studies by historians Jonathan Daniel Wells, Jennifer Green, and others have discovered a southern middle class composed of the kind of people the humorists represented: solid professional townsfolk who read books, went to church, and worked for a living. This was a complicated group that existed in the gray zone http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Fathers on the Frontier: French Missionaries and the Roman Catholic Priesthood in the United States, 1789-1870 (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 1 (4) – Nov 17, 2011

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

At the same time, they move the content and style of southern humor into more universal realms of psychological escape, literary subversion, and masculine identity. Southern humor, they argue, was "transgressive." It's an elastic term that describes this humor's challenge to genteel culture, literary romanticism, polite language, and traditional notions of race and gender. Sexual propriety? Bring seduction and bodily functions into the open. Byronic heroics? Introduce the con man or the bear-rassler. Decorum and gentility? Respond with brag and boast. High-flown oratory? Cuss, openly. One senses that southern men needed these alter egos as avenues of masculine escapism, and that has been the analytic trend in humor studies for some time. Still, southern humor is and was tied to a place, and the Old Southwest was a particularly charged environment. If the need for masculine escape was strong, so was the pull of status and gentility. Recent studies by historians Jonathan Daniel Wells, Jennifer Green, and others have discovered a southern middle class composed of the kind of people the humorists represented: solid professional townsfolk who read books, went to church, and worked for a living. This was a complicated group that existed in the gray zone

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 17, 2011

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