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Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres

Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres Lori Ween What exactly is a family saga? What structures or themes allow certain works to be designated as such, and what are the connections between a text, its historical perspective, and the oral tradition? How does tradition itself translate into the written form? Some scholars have sought to define the criteria for this designation, yet many questions remain, as the definition must stretch to include stories from diverse cultures with varying modes of representation. An understanding of how the famüy saga functions in society as an important cultural artifact is vital to the concretization of the genre. Certain traits appear to me as constants throughout various family sagas, and I wül analyze José de la Cuadra's Los Sangurimas (1934) and Jane Smüey's A Thousand Acres (1991) as novels exploring and reveaUng the foUowing generic features: First of all, each narrative traces the history of a famüy over many generations, from its roots in a specific location or period of time to its downfaU. The theme is almost inevitably the destruction of this family and a reversal of its rules, which may be seen as a negative and tragic downfall or as a liberating and positive step. Secondly, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Family Sagas of the Americas: Los Sangurimas and A Thousand Acres

The Comparatist , Volume 20 (1) – Oct 3, 1996

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
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Abstract

Lori Ween What exactly is a family saga? What structures or themes allow certain works to be designated as such, and what are the connections between a text, its historical perspective, and the oral tradition? How does tradition itself translate into the written form? Some scholars have sought to define the criteria for this designation, yet many questions remain, as the definition must stretch to include stories from diverse cultures with varying modes of representation. An understanding of how the famüy saga functions in society as an important cultural artifact is vital to the concretization of the genre. Certain traits appear to me as constants throughout various family sagas, and I wül analyze José de la Cuadra's Los Sangurimas (1934) and Jane Smüey's A Thousand Acres (1991) as novels exploring and reveaUng the foUowing generic features: First of all, each narrative traces the history of a famüy over many generations, from its roots in a specific location or period of time to its downfaU. The theme is almost inevitably the destruction of this family and a reversal of its rules, which may be seen as a negative and tragic downfall or as a liberating and positive step. Secondly,

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 1996

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