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Evangelicalism and the Politics of Reform in Northern Black Thought, 1776–1863 (review)

Evangelicalism and the Politics of Reform in Northern Black Thought, 1776–1863 (review) that would enrich and extend her study's arguments, particularly in relation to the significance of social networks, while also opening a window into the lives of the poor. As Kennedy acknowledges, much of the existing literature on childbirth during the antebellum period focuses on women's physical and medical experiences, usually in a regional or racially specific context (e.g., elite white women in the North, enslaved women in the South). Kennedy's valuable contribution is to place birth in a social and cultural context, thereby making a compelling argument for the importance of understandings of and discourse about childbirth to the constitution of southern regional identity. Yet, given the range of important historical issues this book addresses--the constitution of southern identity, constructions of masculinity, social and cultural understandings of birth, and the complicated interrelationships between the experiences of the enslaved and the free--Kennedy's impressive study should hold wide appeal for scholars of the South, of gender, of family and childhood, of African American history, and for historians of medicine. Felicity Turner felicity turner was the Law and Society Fellow at the University of Wisconsin Law School for 2011­12. Evangelicalism and the Politics of Reform in Northern Black Thought, 1776­1863. By http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Evangelicalism and the Politics of Reform in Northern Black Thought, 1776–1863 (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

that would enrich and extend her study's arguments, particularly in relation to the significance of social networks, while also opening a window into the lives of the poor. As Kennedy acknowledges, much of the existing literature on childbirth during the antebellum period focuses on women's physical and medical experiences, usually in a regional or racially specific context (e.g., elite white women in the North, enslaved women in the South). Kennedy's valuable contribution is to place birth in a social and cultural context, thereby making a compelling argument for the importance of understandings of and discourse about childbirth to the constitution of southern regional identity. Yet, given the range of important historical issues this book addresses--the constitution of southern identity, constructions of masculinity, social and cultural understandings of birth, and the complicated interrelationships between the experiences of the enslaved and the free--Kennedy's impressive study should hold wide appeal for scholars of the South, of gender, of family and childhood, of African American history, and for historians of medicine. Felicity Turner felicity turner was the Law and Society Fellow at the University of Wisconsin Law School for 2011­12. Evangelicalism and the Politics of Reform in Northern Black Thought, 1776­1863. By

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 29, 2012

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