Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Enjoyment Beyond the Pleasure Principle: Antigone , Julian of Norwich, and the Use of Pleasures

Enjoyment Beyond the Pleasure Principle: Antigone , Julian of Norwich, and the Use of Pleasures Paul allen Miller Enjoyment Beyond the Pleasure Principle Antigone, Julian of Norwich, and the Use of Pleasures In 1984 Michel Foucault published the long awaited sequel to his Histoire de la sexualité. The Use of Pleasures, as volume two was titled, ends with a final chapter called "True Love," which offers a reading of Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus. In many ways, this chapter is crucial to understanding Foucault's whole project in the History of Sexuality. For one thing, it takes up and responds to Lacan's reading of the Symposium in his well-known 1961 seminar on transference and thus is central to understanding the relation between the Histoire and psychoanalysis. For Lacan, the essence of the Symposium is its exploration of the transferential relationship and the logic of substitution that relation implies between Socrates, Alcibiades, and Agathon.1 In his reading, Alcibiades and Agathon, while not identical, are substitutable as objects of desire, insofar as each of them is beautiful. At the same time, Socrates is the object of Alcibiades' desire precisely because Alcibiades desires to be his object. Subject and object, desire and its tokens, all become part of an economy of substitution in which Agathon (literally "Mr. Good") http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Enjoyment Beyond the Pleasure Principle: Antigone , Julian of Norwich, and the Use of Pleasures

The Comparatist , Volume 39 (1) – Nov 20, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/enjoyment-beyond-the-pleasure-principle-antigone-julian-of-norwich-and-mQaOjulEZ5
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paul allen Miller Enjoyment Beyond the Pleasure Principle Antigone, Julian of Norwich, and the Use of Pleasures In 1984 Michel Foucault published the long awaited sequel to his Histoire de la sexualité. The Use of Pleasures, as volume two was titled, ends with a final chapter called "True Love," which offers a reading of Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus. In many ways, this chapter is crucial to understanding Foucault's whole project in the History of Sexuality. For one thing, it takes up and responds to Lacan's reading of the Symposium in his well-known 1961 seminar on transference and thus is central to understanding the relation between the Histoire and psychoanalysis. For Lacan, the essence of the Symposium is its exploration of the transferential relationship and the logic of substitution that relation implies between Socrates, Alcibiades, and Agathon.1 In his reading, Alcibiades and Agathon, while not identical, are substitutable as objects of desire, insofar as each of them is beautiful. At the same time, Socrates is the object of Alcibiades' desire precisely because Alcibiades desires to be his object. Subject and object, desire and its tokens, all become part of an economy of substitution in which Agathon (literally "Mr. Good")

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 20, 2015

There are no references for this article.