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Enhancing Student Learning Through Arts Integration: Implications for the Profession

Enhancing Student Learning Through Arts Integration: Implications for the Profession David E. Gullatt, Ph.D. Louisiana Tech University Introduction The purpose of the present review of literature and research is to examine the numerous benefits the arts provide as enhancements for teaching and learning provided for both educators and students in PK-12 school settings. The relationship between exposure to the arts and student achievement within the academic disciplines such as mathematics, English/language arts, science, and social studies has, until recently, received mixed reviews (Winner & Hetland, 2000, Gullatt, 2007). Writings related to this topic have been typically theoretical in nature with little empirical support. Over the past 10 years prominent theorists and practitioners such as Catterall, Eisner, and Gardner have begun to argue that the arts are integral to the education of the "whole child" (Catterall, 1998; Eisner, 1998; Gardner, 1999a). These noted theorists have recognized and supported the lifelong benefits that the arts have provided students as they became adults. If research and best practice identify benefits to the academic curriculum provided by the arts which can enhance academic gain, then why are the arts so often blatantly overlooked as a ready medium of assistance for teaching and learning in schools across America? The recent slowdown noted in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Enhancing Student Learning Through Arts Integration: Implications for the Profession

The High School Journal , Volume 91 (4) – May 30, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David E. Gullatt, Ph.D. Louisiana Tech University Introduction The purpose of the present review of literature and research is to examine the numerous benefits the arts provide as enhancements for teaching and learning provided for both educators and students in PK-12 school settings. The relationship between exposure to the arts and student achievement within the academic disciplines such as mathematics, English/language arts, science, and social studies has, until recently, received mixed reviews (Winner & Hetland, 2000, Gullatt, 2007). Writings related to this topic have been typically theoretical in nature with little empirical support. Over the past 10 years prominent theorists and practitioners such as Catterall, Eisner, and Gardner have begun to argue that the arts are integral to the education of the "whole child" (Catterall, 1998; Eisner, 1998; Gardner, 1999a). These noted theorists have recognized and supported the lifelong benefits that the arts have provided students as they became adults. If research and best practice identify benefits to the academic curriculum provided by the arts which can enhance academic gain, then why are the arts so often blatantly overlooked as a ready medium of assistance for teaching and learning in schools across America? The recent slowdown noted in

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 30, 2008

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