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Emancipation and the Creation of Modern Liberal States in America and France

Emancipation and the Creation of Modern Liberal States in America and France stephen sawyer & william j. novak He is a man, the equal of all his fellow-men. He is one of the children of the State. --Charles Sumner The Emancipation Proclamation, the Lincoln presidency, and the American Civil War, of course, are topics on which an enormous amount has been written from what seems every conceivable viewpoint. Perhaps only the French Revolution competes as historical subject matter prompting an equal amount of diverse (often fractious) scholarly commentary. It is thus something of a challenge to make room for a fresh perspective. Nevertheless, this article attempts to shed some new light on the historical significance of emancipation by self-consciously widening the interpretive lens. First, it examines the Emancipation Proclamation from the perspective of a burgeoning new literature (both historical and sociotheoretical) on statebuilding--particularly work focused on the distinctive emergence of modern liberal nation-states in the late nineteenth century. Second, it attempts to simultaneously look at Emancipation from home and abroad--in this case, with special attention to the view from France. Like the Civil War, of course, Emancipation was a momentous international event; so was the development of newly powerful and rapidly modernizing nation-states. Exploring the important links between these two http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Emancipation and the Creation of Modern Liberal States in America and France

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 3 (4) – Nov 16, 2013

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

stephen sawyer & william j. novak He is a man, the equal of all his fellow-men. He is one of the children of the State. --Charles Sumner The Emancipation Proclamation, the Lincoln presidency, and the American Civil War, of course, are topics on which an enormous amount has been written from what seems every conceivable viewpoint. Perhaps only the French Revolution competes as historical subject matter prompting an equal amount of diverse (often fractious) scholarly commentary. It is thus something of a challenge to make room for a fresh perspective. Nevertheless, this article attempts to shed some new light on the historical significance of emancipation by self-consciously widening the interpretive lens. First, it examines the Emancipation Proclamation from the perspective of a burgeoning new literature (both historical and sociotheoretical) on statebuilding--particularly work focused on the distinctive emergence of modern liberal nation-states in the late nineteenth century. Second, it attempts to simultaneously look at Emancipation from home and abroad--in this case, with special attention to the view from France. Like the Civil War, of course, Emancipation was a momentous international event; so was the development of newly powerful and rapidly modernizing nation-states. Exploring the important links between these two

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 16, 2013

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