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Ellen Glasgow New Perspectives (review)

Ellen Glasgow New Perspectives (review) the rough and shady political culture of their city, while focusing attention on the state and local issues that had first led dieir predecessors to seek greater influence over public affairs. They did this, says Tyler, as had "previous generations of southern reformers ... by melding elements of tradition and modernity into a formula for change that looked toward the future with an eye to the past." I hope that Tyler's fascinating book will be followed by additional studies of other New Orleans women who made titillating cameo appearances in this book, the female "Longites" and the city's black clubwomen. We also need many more local and state studies of women's political activism in the half-century following enfranchisement. I heartily endorse Tyler's concluding statement: "in locales far beyond the Crescent City, patterns of intense political activity among prefeminist women will be discerned when historians trouble to seek them." Ellen Glasgow New Perspectives Edited by Dorothy M. Scura Tennessee Studies in Literature, Vol. 36, University of Tennessee Press, 1 99 5 251 pp. Cloth, $35.00 Reviewed by Susan V. Donaldson, who teaches American literature and American studies at the College of William and Mary. She and Anne Goodwyn Jones http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Ellen Glasgow New Perspectives (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 4 (4) – Jan 4, 1998

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

the rough and shady political culture of their city, while focusing attention on the state and local issues that had first led dieir predecessors to seek greater influence over public affairs. They did this, says Tyler, as had "previous generations of southern reformers ... by melding elements of tradition and modernity into a formula for change that looked toward the future with an eye to the past." I hope that Tyler's fascinating book will be followed by additional studies of other New Orleans women who made titillating cameo appearances in this book, the female "Longites" and the city's black clubwomen. We also need many more local and state studies of women's political activism in the half-century following enfranchisement. I heartily endorse Tyler's concluding statement: "in locales far beyond the Crescent City, patterns of intense political activity among prefeminist women will be discerned when historians trouble to seek them." Ellen Glasgow New Perspectives Edited by Dorothy M. Scura Tennessee Studies in Literature, Vol. 36, University of Tennessee Press, 1 99 5 251 pp. Cloth, $35.00 Reviewed by Susan V. Donaldson, who teaches American literature and American studies at the College of William and Mary. She and Anne Goodwyn Jones

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1998

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