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Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power (review)

Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power (review) Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power (review) Jonathan Culler The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 139-142 (Review) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0001 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414740/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST REVIEW ESSAYS PAUL BOVE, ed. Edward Said and the Work ofthe Critic: Speaking Truth to Power. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000. 317 pp. Edward Said's fabulous academic career seems a dream for our time. Schooled in the literary canon, adept of high modernism, he became a respected critic and a professor at an Ivy League university; but his most important work, Orientalism, changed forever, as we say hopefully, not just an academic field—the academy's way of looking at a body of writing—but also the structure of presumption in the public sphere. Now, after Orientalism, it has come to be taken for granted that the most enlightened attitude toward non-Western cultures is one that allows them to speak for themselves rather than to be spoken for. It is not that ideas of Western superiority have been vanquished but that the structure ofunquestioned superiority from which the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 26 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Edward Said and the Work of the Critic: Speaking Truth to Power (review) Jonathan Culler The Comparatist, Volume 26, May 2002, pp. 139-142 (Review) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.2002.0001 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/414740/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 10:54 GMT from JHU Libraries THE COMPAKATIST REVIEW ESSAYS PAUL BOVE, ed. Edward Said and the Work ofthe Critic: Speaking Truth to Power. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000. 317 pp. Edward Said's fabulous academic career seems a dream for our time. Schooled in the literary canon, adept of high modernism, he became a respected critic and a professor at an Ivy League university; but his most important work, Orientalism, changed forever, as we say hopefully, not just an academic field—the academy's way of looking at a body of writing—but also the structure of presumption in the public sphere. Now, after Orientalism, it has come to be taken for granted that the most enlightened attitude toward non-Western cultures is one that allows them to speak for themselves rather than to be spoken for. It is not that ideas of Western superiority have been vanquished but that the structure ofunquestioned superiority from which the

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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