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Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note As we enter the fifth year of publication of the Journal of the Civil War Era, it remains rewarding to showcase vibrant new work. We may, in fact, be in a time of increased output on many fronts as scholars push their inquiry into new directions--sometimes by going back over what may seem like familiar ground. The research articles in this issue revisit the ethnic dimension of the Civil War era, specifically German Americans and their part in not only the war but also in American life. While ethnic studies follow in a long-established tradition, the following articles bring fresh questions to the subject and reflect the perspectives of research conducted during a moment of increased awareness of the war and society in a wider world. Opening the volume year, Andrew Zimmerman pinpoints the revolutionary ideals that informed certain of the Civil War officers transplanted from Germany. Using their European experiences, generals such as Franz Sigel waged a war for the transformation of property relations (in this case, slavery) from very early in the conflict. Zimmerman thus leads readers on a journey that begins on the Rhine and ends on the Mississippi. Next, Mischa Honeck analyzes how manhood http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
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Abstract

As we enter the fifth year of publication of the Journal of the Civil War Era, it remains rewarding to showcase vibrant new work. We may, in fact, be in a time of increased output on many fronts as scholars push their inquiry into new directions--sometimes by going back over what may seem like familiar ground. The research articles in this issue revisit the ethnic dimension of the Civil War era, specifically German Americans and their part in not only the war but also in American life. While ethnic studies follow in a long-established tradition, the following articles bring fresh questions to the subject and reflect the perspectives of research conducted during a moment of increased awareness of the war and society in a wider world. Opening the volume year, Andrew Zimmerman pinpoints the revolutionary ideals that informed certain of the Civil War officers transplanted from Germany. Using their European experiences, generals such as Franz Sigel waged a war for the transformation of property relations (in this case, slavery) from very early in the conflict. Zimmerman thus leads readers on a journey that begins on the Rhine and ends on the Mississippi. Next, Mischa Honeck analyzes how manhood

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 5, 2015

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