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Editor's Note

Editor's Note As Douglas R. Egerton noted in the inaugural issue of The Journal of the Civil War Era, the Atlantic World framework that has enlivened discussion of the history of the early modern era most often fades before reaching the middle and latter portions of the nineteenth century. International dimensions of the U.S. Civil War traditionally have involved diplomacy or the cotton trade, with most of the analysis conducted on an east-west axis between Europe (primarily England) and Washington. Recently, the African slave trade has gained more attention. However, signs indicate a new emphasis emerging in the scholarship of the war that has revealed additional merits for pushing beyond the borders of the United States. Whether that means using an Atlantic World framework, transnational methodology, or comparative techniques, this nascent trend raises new questions and, to answer them, reaches for both old and new tools. Today, we offer a special issue that focuses on "New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War Era," indicating the promise of situating the U.S. portion of the era in a larger world. We owe a special thanks to W. Caleb McDaniel and Bethany L. Johnson for serving as guest editors of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807
Publisher site
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Abstract

As Douglas R. Egerton noted in the inaugural issue of The Journal of the Civil War Era, the Atlantic World framework that has enlivened discussion of the history of the early modern era most often fades before reaching the middle and latter portions of the nineteenth century. International dimensions of the U.S. Civil War traditionally have involved diplomacy or the cotton trade, with most of the analysis conducted on an east-west axis between Europe (primarily England) and Washington. Recently, the African slave trade has gained more attention. However, signs indicate a new emphasis emerging in the scholarship of the war that has revealed additional merits for pushing beyond the borders of the United States. Whether that means using an Atlantic World framework, transnational methodology, or comparative techniques, this nascent trend raises new questions and, to answer them, reaches for both old and new tools. Today, we offer a special issue that focuses on "New Approaches to Internationalizing the History of the Civil War Era," indicating the promise of situating the U.S. portion of the era in a larger world. We owe a special thanks to W. Caleb McDaniel and Bethany L. Johnson for serving as guest editors of

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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