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Driving Miss Daisy: Southern Jewishness on the Big Screen

Driving Miss Daisy: Southern Jewishness on the Big Screen ESSAY ...................... Driving Miss Daisy Southern Jewishness on the Big Screen by Eliza Russi Lowen McGraw Daisy ( Jessica Tandy) and Hoke (Morgan Freeman) spend their time together with the trademark 1948 Hudson, and the world around them speeds by. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. © 1989 Warner Brothers, Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. he release of the film Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 made American moviegoers aware of the ongoing presence of southern Jewishness.1 Alfred Uhry wrote the film's screenplay from his 1987 autobiographically informed Pulitzer prize-winning play, the story of the relationship between Daisy Werthan, a Jewish Atlanta matron, and Hoke Colebum, her African American chauffeur. Like many Hollywood duos, Hoke, played by Morgan Freeman, and Daisy, played by Jessica Tandy, come together inauspiciously. Seventy-two-year-old Daisy crashes her car, and her son, Boolie (Dan Akroyd), deciding she needs someone to drive her, hires Hoke. At first Daisy will not even enter the car, but eventually Hoke wins her over. As they age, the two forge a strong and complicated bond that challenges some socially proscribed southern mores but leaves others intact. Driving Miss Daisy demonstrates the inseparability of Jewishness and history within http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Driving Miss Daisy: Southern Jewishness on the Big Screen

Southern Cultures , Volume 7 (2) – Jan 5, 2001

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

ESSAY ...................... Driving Miss Daisy Southern Jewishness on the Big Screen by Eliza Russi Lowen McGraw Daisy ( Jessica Tandy) and Hoke (Morgan Freeman) spend their time together with the trademark 1948 Hudson, and the world around them speeds by. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art Film Stills Archive. © 1989 Warner Brothers, Incorporated. All Rights Reserved. he release of the film Driving Miss Daisy in 1989 made American moviegoers aware of the ongoing presence of southern Jewishness.1 Alfred Uhry wrote the film's screenplay from his 1987 autobiographically informed Pulitzer prize-winning play, the story of the relationship between Daisy Werthan, a Jewish Atlanta matron, and Hoke Colebum, her African American chauffeur. Like many Hollywood duos, Hoke, played by Morgan Freeman, and Daisy, played by Jessica Tandy, come together inauspiciously. Seventy-two-year-old Daisy crashes her car, and her son, Boolie (Dan Akroyd), deciding she needs someone to drive her, hires Hoke. At first Daisy will not even enter the car, but eventually Hoke wins her over. As they age, the two forge a strong and complicated bond that challenges some socially proscribed southern mores but leaves others intact. Driving Miss Daisy demonstrates the inseparability of Jewishness and history within

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 5, 2001

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