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Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the Civil War (review)

Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the Civil War (review) this tradition or something qualitatively new? Moreover, Barbara Welke's Recasting American Liberty: Gender, Race, Law, and the Railroad Revolution, 1865­1920 (2001) charts changing conceptions of law and state power vis-à-vis liberty in public spaces and finds that liberty for many Americans came to depend upon the deployment of state power rather than its absence. How different were the changes Welke charts aboard trains and streetcars from what Keller describes for streets and parks? These questions aside, Keller provides further evidence for historians interested in understanding the growth of state power and the importance of law in structuring the emergence of modern America in a supposed era of laissez-faire. Overall, Keller shows us how free speech and assembly--what many presume to be impregnable democratic values--became highly regulated in two of the world's leading cities. Her provocative history will force readers to wrestle with the ascension of order within modern democracies and consider the consequences for the meaning and experience of freedom. Kyle G. Volk kyle g. volk, assistant professor of history at the University of Montana, is completing a book about moral politics and democracy in nineteenth-century America. Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the Civil War (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (2) – May 19, 2012

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

this tradition or something qualitatively new? Moreover, Barbara Welke's Recasting American Liberty: Gender, Race, Law, and the Railroad Revolution, 1865­1920 (2001) charts changing conceptions of law and state power vis-à-vis liberty in public spaces and finds that liberty for many Americans came to depend upon the deployment of state power rather than its absence. How different were the changes Welke charts aboard trains and streetcars from what Keller describes for streets and parks? These questions aside, Keller provides further evidence for historians interested in understanding the growth of state power and the importance of law in structuring the emergence of modern America in a supposed era of laissez-faire. Overall, Keller shows us how free speech and assembly--what many presume to be impregnable democratic values--became highly regulated in two of the world's leading cities. Her provocative history will force readers to wrestle with the ascension of order within modern democracies and consider the consequences for the meaning and experience of freedom. Kyle G. Volk kyle g. volk, assistant professor of history at the University of Montana, is completing a book about moral politics and democracy in nineteenth-century America. Driven West: Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears to the

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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