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Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture (review)

Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate... Dixie's Daughters The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture By Karen L. Cox University Press of Florida, 2003 218 pp. Cloth, $55.00 Reviewed by Gaines M. Foster, professor of history at Louisiana State University and author of Ghosts of the Confederacy: Defeat, the Lost Cause, and the Emergence of the New South, 1865­1913 and Moral Reconstruction: Christian Lobbyists and the Federal Legislation of Morality, 1865­1920. Many young southerners today may never have heard of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (udc). If they have, they probably did so when Congress refused to renew a patent on its insignia or when the Daughters defended the flying of the Confederate flag. A century ago, however, most southerners knew of the udc and its activities; it was the largest independent organization of women in the region. Despite the udc's historical importance, however, Dixie's Daughters is the first (other than official histories) book-length study of the group. Author Karen L. Cox traces the origins of the United Daughters of the Confederacy to the Civil War relief efforts of southern women and, more directly, to the numerous Ladies Memorial Associations that formed right after the war. These local http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Dixie's Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 10 (1) – May 3, 2004

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Dixie's Daughters The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture By Karen L. Cox University Press of Florida, 2003 218 pp. Cloth, $55.00 Reviewed by Gaines M. Foster, professor of history at Louisiana State University and author of Ghosts of the Confederacy: Defeat, the Lost Cause, and the Emergence of the New South, 1865­1913 and Moral Reconstruction: Christian Lobbyists and the Federal Legislation of Morality, 1865­1920. Many young southerners today may never have heard of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (udc). If they have, they probably did so when Congress refused to renew a patent on its insignia or when the Daughters defended the flying of the Confederate flag. A century ago, however, most southerners knew of the udc and its activities; it was the largest independent organization of women in the region. Despite the udc's historical importance, however, Dixie's Daughters is the first (other than official histories) book-length study of the group. Author Karen L. Cox traces the origins of the United Daughters of the Confederacy to the Civil War relief efforts of southern women and, more directly, to the numerous Ladies Memorial Associations that formed right after the war. These local

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 3, 2004

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