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Discovering Carl

Discovering Carl Upbeat Down South by Shawn P itt S I like to imagine what it might have been like for Carl Perkins that day: the drive, the anticipation, the performance—all of it. U.S. Route 45 meandered in a lazy series of curves out of Jackson, Tenn - es see, a slick black ribbon of tw lan o-e highway that took a hard right turn near the county line, plunging, as if with sudden purpose, toward the Mississippi state line. West Tennessee was experiencing an unseasonably warm and wet winter that year. Christmas of 1950 had come and gone, giving way to a drizzly New Year’s Day. At 50 degrees, it must have felt more like April than January. Scattered along the roadside at odd intervals were the t h ono kn s w ky-here working- clas s country boys and farmhands blew off steam by drinking and danc- ing with their girls, and throwing punches and beer bottles at each other before staggering home to sleep it o. ff Many of these were familiar haunts for th-e kid be hind the wheel, none more so than the infamous Cotton Boll Club which derived its name from the rural environs. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Discovering Carl

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (4) – Jan 19, 2018

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488

Abstract

Upbeat Down South by Shawn P itt S I like to imagine what it might have been like for Carl Perkins that day: the drive, the anticipation, the performance—all of it. U.S. Route 45 meandered in a lazy series of curves out of Jackson, Tenn - es see, a slick black ribbon of tw lan o-e highway that took a hard right turn near the county line, plunging, as if with sudden purpose, toward the Mississippi state line. West Tennessee was experiencing an unseasonably warm and wet winter that year. Christmas of 1950 had come and gone, giving way to a drizzly New Year’s Day. At 50 degrees, it must have felt more like April than January. Scattered along the roadside at odd intervals were the t h ono kn s w ky-here working- clas s country boys and farmhands blew off steam by drinking and danc- ing with their girls, and throwing punches and beer bottles at each other before staggering home to sleep it o. ff Many of these were familiar haunts for th-e kid be hind the wheel, none more so than the infamous Cotton Boll Club which derived its name from the rural environs. The

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 19, 2018

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