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Differential School Functioning in a Block Schedule: A Comparison of Academic Profiles

Differential School Functioning in a Block Schedule: A Comparison of Academic Profiles This study examined the impact of different student academic profiles on students' perceptions of school functioning within a modified alternating day, block-8 (A/B) schedule. Five academic profiles of students were identified using reports of their grades, satisfaction with their achievement, attributions of success to effort or ability, attributions of achievement to scheduling, and attitudes toward school. Average and high achievers, who were satisfied with their achievement and believed school is important, had the highest levels of school functioning and the highest support for block scheduling. Lower achievers had the least support for block scheduling, the worst teacher relations, and the worst perceptions of student behavior. Low achievers who believed that school is important and were displeased with their grades had the most difficulty managing school within a block schedule. Results suggest the need for further faculty development and additional student support. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Differential School Functioning in a Block Schedule: A Comparison of Academic Profiles

The High School Journal , Volume 84 (4) – May 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

This study examined the impact of different student academic profiles on students' perceptions of school functioning within a modified alternating day, block-8 (A/B) schedule. Five academic profiles of students were identified using reports of their grades, satisfaction with their achievement, attributions of success to effort or ability, attributions of achievement to scheduling, and attitudes toward school. Average and high achievers, who were satisfied with their achievement and believed school is important, had the highest levels of school functioning and the highest support for block scheduling. Lower achievers had the least support for block scheduling, the worst teacher relations, and the worst perceptions of student behavior. Low achievers who believed that school is important and were displeased with their grades had the most difficulty managing school within a block schedule. Results suggest the need for further faculty development and additional student support.

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 1, 2001

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