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Declarations of Dependence: The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908 (review)

Declarations of Dependence: The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908... exploration narrative" (241): southerners, black and white, were figured as bestial and backward, thereby justifying federal occupation and control. Our South concludes by considering how late nineteenth-century authors responded to the consensus among Dunning school historians that Reconstruction was a mistake. Whereas Thomas Dixon and Thomas Nelson Page cast U.S. imperial actions in Cuba and the Philippines as commensurate with the southern "white man's burden" during and after Reconstruction, black women writers Anna Julia Cooper and Pauline Hopkins challenged the consensus. This overview does scant justice to the full range of Our South's readings: Greeson also discusses Thomas Paine, Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs, among others. It would be churlish to note the absence of, say, Mark Twain. A more legitimate criticism is that occasionally Our South's breadth comes at the expense of depth: for example, the brief reading of Lydia Child's Letters from New-York hangs too heavily on a single passage. Ultimately, however, Our South's numerous insights into the narrative invention of "the nation's region" before the twentieth century should make this book required reading for "southernists" and Americanists, literary critics and historians alike. Martyn Bone notes 1. Houston http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Declarations of Dependence: The Long Reconstruction of Popular Politics in the South, 1861-1908 (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (2) – May 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

exploration narrative" (241): southerners, black and white, were figured as bestial and backward, thereby justifying federal occupation and control. Our South concludes by considering how late nineteenth-century authors responded to the consensus among Dunning school historians that Reconstruction was a mistake. Whereas Thomas Dixon and Thomas Nelson Page cast U.S. imperial actions in Cuba and the Philippines as commensurate with the southern "white man's burden" during and after Reconstruction, black women writers Anna Julia Cooper and Pauline Hopkins challenged the consensus. This overview does scant justice to the full range of Our South's readings: Greeson also discusses Thomas Paine, Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs, among others. It would be churlish to note the absence of, say, Mark Twain. A more legitimate criticism is that occasionally Our South's breadth comes at the expense of depth: for example, the brief reading of Lydia Child's Letters from New-York hangs too heavily on a single passage. Ultimately, however, Our South's numerous insights into the narrative invention of "the nation's region" before the twentieth century should make this book required reading for "southernists" and Americanists, literary critics and historians alike. Martyn Bone notes 1. Houston

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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