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Dada East: The Romanians of the Cabaret Voltaire (review)

Dada East: The Romanians of the Cabaret Voltaire (review) cal allegiances centering on imagination. If imagination informs Sévigné’s treat- ment of her absent daughter, the chapter’s highlight is her narratives of sudden death, which Lyons relates both to her idiosyncratic brand of meditation and to her Jansenist affiliations. e Th ftfih chapter features a wonderfully original reading of Madeleine de Scu déry’s Clélie, in which Lyons explores the workings of collective imagination and the imaginative strategies of several key characters, memorably treating the carte de tendre as a form of meditative therapy the heroine oe ff rs to her lovers. In La Princesse de Clèves, on the other hand, the characters seem unable to direct their overwrought imaginations, while the narrator’s refusal to disclose their contents forecasts a change in the status of the imaginative faculty. e Th conclusion shows how, during the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Mod - erns, partisans of the ancients discredited imagination as feminine and childish. Nevertheless, Lyons’s readings of Boileau, Fénélon, and Rousseau argue that by transforming imagination from an active and inward-directed faculty to a passive, receptive one, these writers laid the basis for its reemergence as the special endow- ment we revere today. In his book, Lyons both den http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Dada East: The Romanians of the Cabaret Voltaire (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 31 – May 29, 2007

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

cal allegiances centering on imagination. If imagination informs Sévigné’s treat- ment of her absent daughter, the chapter’s highlight is her narratives of sudden death, which Lyons relates both to her idiosyncratic brand of meditation and to her Jansenist affiliations. e Th ftfih chapter features a wonderfully original reading of Madeleine de Scu déry’s Clélie, in which Lyons explores the workings of collective imagination and the imaginative strategies of several key characters, memorably treating the carte de tendre as a form of meditative therapy the heroine oe ff rs to her lovers. In La Princesse de Clèves, on the other hand, the characters seem unable to direct their overwrought imaginations, while the narrator’s refusal to disclose their contents forecasts a change in the status of the imaginative faculty. e Th conclusion shows how, during the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Mod - erns, partisans of the ancients discredited imagination as feminine and childish. Nevertheless, Lyons’s readings of Boileau, Fénélon, and Rousseau argue that by transforming imagination from an active and inward-directed faculty to a passive, receptive one, these writers laid the basis for its reemergence as the special endow- ment we revere today. In his book, Lyons both den

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 29, 2007

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