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Cyclorama: An Atlanta Monument

Cyclorama: An Atlanta Monument Essay .................... Cyclorama An Atlanta Monument by Daniel Judt On May 1, 1886, Jefferson Davis visited Atlanta for the last time. He had agreed to speak at the unveiling of a statue of the late Georgia senator Benjamin Harvey Hill. The former president of the Confederacy looked gaunt and frail. He sat on stage during the ceremony, and one might imagine that the crowd of fty thousand watched his every dget. “We hope on that day to hear the real, old fashion rebel yell, having never heard it,” wrote the DeKalb Chronicle’s editors. “We reckon it will offend no one, but if so, let it offend.” And sure enough, when Davis rose, the crowd roared, Yee-­Haw! or, perhaps, Yay-­Hoo! Davis gave a short speech praising the late senator, and then the crowd dispersed.1 The man who introduced Davis that day was Henry Grady. Grady was Davis’s opposite. The chief apostle of the New South movement, Grady was a master of reconciliation. To the North, he preached understanding through commerce; to the South, glory through growth. And though Davis drew the crowd, Grady was master of ceremonies. Davis was seventy-­ ight, Grady thirty-­ ve. Perhaps this was a nal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Cyclorama: An Atlanta Monument

Southern Cultures , Volume 23 (2) – Jul 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Essay .................... Cyclorama An Atlanta Monument by Daniel Judt On May 1, 1886, Jefferson Davis visited Atlanta for the last time. He had agreed to speak at the unveiling of a statue of the late Georgia senator Benjamin Harvey Hill. The former president of the Confederacy looked gaunt and frail. He sat on stage during the ceremony, and one might imagine that the crowd of fty thousand watched his every dget. “We hope on that day to hear the real, old fashion rebel yell, having never heard it,” wrote the DeKalb Chronicle’s editors. “We reckon it will offend no one, but if so, let it offend.” And sure enough, when Davis rose, the crowd roared, Yee-­Haw! or, perhaps, Yay-­Hoo! Davis gave a short speech praising the late senator, and then the crowd dispersed.1 The man who introduced Davis that day was Henry Grady. Grady was Davis’s opposite. The chief apostle of the New South movement, Grady was a master of reconciliation. To the North, he preached understanding through commerce; to the South, glory through growth. And though Davis drew the crowd, Grady was master of ceremonies. Davis was seventy-­ ight, Grady thirty-­ ve. Perhaps this was a nal

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 20, 2017

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