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Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students and the Power of Labels

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students and the Power of Labels N. Dede A. Addy "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me" - or so the old saying goes. And yet, throughout history particular words and labels have been linked to manifestations of power and domination. Some labels may be highly charged, controversial, or derogatory, such as slut, Octaroon, or illegal immigrant. Others may be more mundane, but still associated with material consequences, such as sir, ma'am, boy, criminal, or blue collar. The mere categorization of words as politically correct or incorrect is an indication of their social power. In the realm of education, references to culturally and linguistically diverse students are now in vogue. In recent years this phrase has been the label of choice to describe the growing diversity in the U.S student population, often used to refer to students who are immigrants, who are not White or who speak languages other than, standardized English. A basic database search on JSTOR for material related to culturally and linguistically diverse students alone yielded 3,788 papers. It is noteworthy that educational scholars, practitioners, and policymakers are taking students from marginalized cultural and linguistic backgrounds into greater consideration, because historically, the U.S. educational system http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students and the Power of Labels

The High School Journal , Volume 98 (3) – Apr 23, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
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Abstract

N. Dede A. Addy "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me" - or so the old saying goes. And yet, throughout history particular words and labels have been linked to manifestations of power and domination. Some labels may be highly charged, controversial, or derogatory, such as slut, Octaroon, or illegal immigrant. Others may be more mundane, but still associated with material consequences, such as sir, ma'am, boy, criminal, or blue collar. The mere categorization of words as politically correct or incorrect is an indication of their social power. In the realm of education, references to culturally and linguistically diverse students are now in vogue. In recent years this phrase has been the label of choice to describe the growing diversity in the U.S student population, often used to refer to students who are immigrants, who are not White or who speak languages other than, standardized English. A basic database search on JSTOR for material related to culturally and linguistically diverse students alone yielded 3,788 papers. It is noteworthy that educational scholars, practitioners, and policymakers are taking students from marginalized cultural and linguistic backgrounds into greater consideration, because historically, the U.S. educational system

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Apr 23, 2015

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