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Crossing the Deadlines: Civil War Prisons Reconsidered ed. Michael P. Gray (review)

Crossing the Deadlines: Civil War Prisons Reconsidered ed. Michael P. Gray (review) was nearly as important as the ammunition transports. Samuel Lockett, chief engineer for the Confederate Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, was concerned by the repeated calls for entrenching tools by the Army of Tennessee during the Atlanta campaign. In Lockett’s estima- tion, the Union army was much better at digging than theirs. Sherman would take Atlanta unless the Confederate army resorted to battle instead of defending earthworks, thought this veteran of the failed defense of Vicksburg. If there is a shortcoming in this book, it is the omission of the basic fact—barring a decisive defeat inflicted in an open field fight—that terrain and trenches could not stop Sherman in 1864, as Lockett noted. Raids in Sherman’s rear and even major disruptions to his supply line would only slow him, given the lesson he had learned about living off the land dur - ing the Meridian campaign. The Army of Tennessee lacked the numbers to establish a continuous defensive line to prevent Sherman’s forward movement. Lacking a Western Front from Switzerland to Channel, for- midable positions like Kennesaw Mountain could and would be flanked. Sherman’s army incurred several bloody noses due to natural and man- made Confederate defensive lines, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Crossing the Deadlines: Civil War Prisons Reconsidered ed. Michael P. Gray (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (1) – Mar 2, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

was nearly as important as the ammunition transports. Samuel Lockett, chief engineer for the Confederate Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, was concerned by the repeated calls for entrenching tools by the Army of Tennessee during the Atlanta campaign. In Lockett’s estima- tion, the Union army was much better at digging than theirs. Sherman would take Atlanta unless the Confederate army resorted to battle instead of defending earthworks, thought this veteran of the failed defense of Vicksburg. If there is a shortcoming in this book, it is the omission of the basic fact—barring a decisive defeat inflicted in an open field fight—that terrain and trenches could not stop Sherman in 1864, as Lockett noted. Raids in Sherman’s rear and even major disruptions to his supply line would only slow him, given the lesson he had learned about living off the land dur - ing the Meridian campaign. The Army of Tennessee lacked the numbers to establish a continuous defensive line to prevent Sherman’s forward movement. Lacking a Western Front from Switzerland to Channel, for- midable positions like Kennesaw Mountain could and would be flanked. Sherman’s army incurred several bloody noses due to natural and man- made Confederate defensive lines,

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Mar 2, 2020

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