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Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South by David Stefan Doddington (review)

Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South by David Stefan Doddington (review) Citizenship, and Survival in Nineteenth-Century Latin America (University of Nebraska Press, forthcoming). Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South. By David Stefan Doddington. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Pp. 246. Cloth, $49.99.) Gendered studies of slavery in the antebellum American South have been prolific in recent years. It all started with the publication of Deborah Gray White’s Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (1985), which placed the life cycle, labor, and family of enslaved women at the center of historical examination. White’s work triggered a wave of research into the lives of enslaved women, examining their gendered world, and demonstrating the ways they attempted to resist their enslave- ment and restore their femininity. Stephanie Camp’s Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South (2004) is a notable example. More recently, historians have been building on the achievements of these studies of enslaved women and have turned their attention to the study of enslaved men and issues of masculinity. For example, my own work, My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South (2016), was inspired by the advances made by the likes of Deborah Gray White and Stephanie Camp http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South by David Stefan Doddington (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 9 (3) – Sep 3, 2019

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Citizenship, and Survival in Nineteenth-Century Latin America (University of Nebraska Press, forthcoming). Contesting Slave Masculinity in the American South. By David Stefan Doddington. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Pp. 246. Cloth, $49.99.) Gendered studies of slavery in the antebellum American South have been prolific in recent years. It all started with the publication of Deborah Gray White’s Ar’n’t I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South (1985), which placed the life cycle, labor, and family of enslaved women at the center of historical examination. White’s work triggered a wave of research into the lives of enslaved women, examining their gendered world, and demonstrating the ways they attempted to resist their enslave- ment and restore their femininity. Stephanie Camp’s Closer to Freedom: Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South (2004) is a notable example. More recently, historians have been building on the achievements of these studies of enslaved women and have turned their attention to the study of enslaved men and issues of masculinity. For example, my own work, My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South (2016), was inspired by the advances made by the likes of Deborah Gray White and Stephanie Camp

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Sep 3, 2019

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