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Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South by Jaime Amanda Martinez (review)

Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South by Jaime Amanda Martinez (review) erik j. chaput teaches American history at the Lawrenceville School. He is the author of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion (University Press of Kansas, 2013) and “Republicans and Abolitionists on the Road to ‘Jubilee’: Recent Scholarship and Primary Sources on the Destruction of American Slavery, 1861–1865,” Common-Place 14, no. 3 (2014). Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South. By Jaime Amanda Martinez. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. Pp. 248. Cloth, $39.95.) At the start of the Civil War, Confederate strategists believed that slav- ery would provide the margin of victory in their bid for independence. Enslaved laborers constituted the key agricultural workforce, and in most cities they also played an important part in transportation, manufactur- ing, and the trades. Thanks to that labor, white men could concentrate on fi ghting the Yankees. Over time, internal and external forces destabilized this model, but not before southerners found a new way for slaves to sup- port the war, namely, as military laborers. Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South concentrates on Virginia and North Carolina. For vari- ous geographic, demographic, and strategic reasons, the experiences of the two states diff ered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South by Jaime Amanda Martinez (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

erik j. chaput teaches American history at the Lawrenceville School. He is the author of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion (University Press of Kansas, 2013) and “Republicans and Abolitionists on the Road to ‘Jubilee’: Recent Scholarship and Primary Sources on the Destruction of American Slavery, 1861–1865,” Common-Place 14, no. 3 (2014). Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South. By Jaime Amanda Martinez. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. Pp. 248. Cloth, $39.95.) At the start of the Civil War, Confederate strategists believed that slav- ery would provide the margin of victory in their bid for independence. Enslaved laborers constituted the key agricultural workforce, and in most cities they also played an important part in transportation, manufactur- ing, and the trades. Thanks to that labor, white men could concentrate on fi ghting the Yankees. Over time, internal and external forces destabilized this model, but not before southerners found a new way for slaves to sup- port the war, namely, as military laborers. Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South concentrates on Virginia and North Carolina. For vari- ous geographic, demographic, and strategic reasons, the experiences of the two states diff ered.

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 5, 2015

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