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Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War by Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor (review)

Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War by Elizabeth... book revi ews Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War. By Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016. Pp. 218. Cloth, $34.95.) Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor uses travel as a lens to examine black freedom in the North during the antebellum era, exploring in Colored Travelers the challenges and obstacles black Americans encountered as they jour- neyed inside and outside the United States. Pryor convincingly asserts that government-sanctioned segregation, social customs, and popular culture “surveilled, curtailed, and discouraged black mobility,” and she contends that African Americans refused to be contained and instead fought for their right to move freely around their communities, the country, and the world (1). Her approach is as refreshing and creative as it is illuminat- ing. Many historians have detailed the restrictions placed on black free- dom in the free antebellum North, and other scholars have focused on the organizations established and led by the black elite to combat race-based discrimination. Pryor provides a major contribution by focusing on those who traveled, often to speak on the abolitionist circuit and to establish and support national and local organizations committed to racial justice and equity. Others traveled to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War by Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor (review)

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

book revi ews Colored Travelers: Mobility and the Fight for Citizenship before the Civil War. By Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016. Pp. 218. Cloth, $34.95.) Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor uses travel as a lens to examine black freedom in the North during the antebellum era, exploring in Colored Travelers the challenges and obstacles black Americans encountered as they jour- neyed inside and outside the United States. Pryor convincingly asserts that government-sanctioned segregation, social customs, and popular culture “surveilled, curtailed, and discouraged black mobility,” and she contends that African Americans refused to be contained and instead fought for their right to move freely around their communities, the country, and the world (1). Her approach is as refreshing and creative as it is illuminat- ing. Many historians have detailed the restrictions placed on black free- dom in the free antebellum North, and other scholars have focused on the organizations established and led by the black elite to combat race-based discrimination. Pryor provides a major contribution by focusing on those who traveled, often to speak on the abolitionist circuit and to establish and support national and local organizations committed to racial justice and equity. Others traveled to

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 31, 2017

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