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Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America by Thomas J. Brown (review)

Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America by Thomas J. Brown (review) Oklahoma from Mississippi in 1907. Before long, however, they looked elsewhere for a refuge from the violence and disenfranchisement that had followed them from the South to the West. In the end, the Davises and Colemans, like many others, saw West Africa as where they might finally find land of their own. This possibility appeared in 1913 when a back-to-Africa movement, led by a West African man named Chief Alfred Sam, emerged in rural Oklahoma. Chapter 4 follows Monroe Coleman and Elic Davis as they became involved with this pre–Marcus Garvey movement after hearing Chief Sam speak. Like other migrants, they decided to travel with their families to West Africa because it offered the possibility of land. Though this movement has not received much attention from historians until now, Field demonstrates that knowledge of it circulated among African Americans, including rural working people and W. E. B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington, both of whom disdained it. Problems quickly beset the migrants after their arrival in West Africa, and most of those who trav- eled with Chief Sam in 1914–15 sailed back to the United States. Yet Field resists calling it a failure or a scam, as many, including http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America by Thomas J. Brown (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 10 (3) – Aug 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Oklahoma from Mississippi in 1907. Before long, however, they looked elsewhere for a refuge from the violence and disenfranchisement that had followed them from the South to the West. In the end, the Davises and Colemans, like many others, saw West Africa as where they might finally find land of their own. This possibility appeared in 1913 when a back-to-Africa movement, led by a West African man named Chief Alfred Sam, emerged in rural Oklahoma. Chapter 4 follows Monroe Coleman and Elic Davis as they became involved with this pre–Marcus Garvey movement after hearing Chief Sam speak. Like other migrants, they decided to travel with their families to West Africa because it offered the possibility of land. Though this movement has not received much attention from historians until now, Field demonstrates that knowledge of it circulated among African Americans, including rural working people and W. E. B. DuBois and Booker T. Washington, both of whom disdained it. Problems quickly beset the migrants after their arrival in West Africa, and most of those who trav- eled with Chief Sam in 1914–15 sailed back to the United States. Yet Field resists calling it a failure or a scam, as many, including

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Aug 28, 2020

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