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Civil Rights Chronicle Letters from the South (review)

Civil Rights Chronicle Letters from the South (review) Civil Rights Chronicle Letters from the South By Clarice T. Campbell University Press of Mississippi, 1 997 264 pp. Paper, $ 1 7.00 Reviewed by MeKon McLaurin, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and author of Separate Pasts: Growing Up White in the Segregated South and Celia, a Slave, as well as numerous articles on race relations. In the summer of 1956 Clarice Campbell, a junior high school teacher from Pasadena, California, boarded a Greyhound bus for Oxford, Mississippi, where she enrolled in classes at the University of Mississippi. Wife, mother, devout Methodist, and staunch Republican, Campbell had entered the alien world of the segregated Deep Soudi, and like many anodier sojourning foreigner, found herself intrigued and enticed by a society in the throes of social revolution. In 1957, Campbell returned to the South, this time accompanied by her mother, spending the summer in classes at the University ofAlabama. After three more years in service as a teacher in Pasadena, in die fall of 1 960, motivated by a combination of missionary zeal, intellectual curiosity, and an appreciation for the absurd, Campbell accepted a faculty position at Rust College, an African American school http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

Civil Rights Chronicle Letters from the South (review)

Southern Cultures , Volume 5 (2) – Jan 4, 1999

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Center for the Study of the American South.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Civil Rights Chronicle Letters from the South By Clarice T. Campbell University Press of Mississippi, 1 997 264 pp. Paper, $ 1 7.00 Reviewed by MeKon McLaurin, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and author of Separate Pasts: Growing Up White in the Segregated South and Celia, a Slave, as well as numerous articles on race relations. In the summer of 1956 Clarice Campbell, a junior high school teacher from Pasadena, California, boarded a Greyhound bus for Oxford, Mississippi, where she enrolled in classes at the University of Mississippi. Wife, mother, devout Methodist, and staunch Republican, Campbell had entered the alien world of the segregated Deep Soudi, and like many anodier sojourning foreigner, found herself intrigued and enticed by a society in the throes of social revolution. In 1957, Campbell returned to the South, this time accompanied by her mother, spending the summer in classes at the University ofAlabama. After three more years in service as a teacher in Pasadena, in die fall of 1 960, motivated by a combination of missionary zeal, intellectual curiosity, and an appreciation for the absurd, Campbell accepted a faculty position at Rust College, an African American school

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jan 4, 1999

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