Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (review)

Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (review) employ die ff rent manners of dealing with assimilation in the context of the domi- nating United States culture. Chapter 2 deals with the issue of bisexuliaty as a theme formed within Lesbi c fi tion, which is a category of lesbian c fi tion connoting female bisexuality. A pertinent feature of this section of Frohlich’s study is the use of the Rosamaría Roe ffi l’s novel Amora (1989), which challenges the incorporation of common, North American derived terminology for gays and lesbians, such as the term “gay,” into Mexican vernacular. Observing the novel’s commentary on this use of language, Frolich helps the reader see the way in which the work contests the commonalities of gay/lesbian/queer culture across national borders, calling this move by the author “a resistance to the assumed superiority of the United States and its ethos of identity politics that posits a universal model for all to follow” (72). Following this discussion Frolich continues to reveal the problematic of lesbian subjectivity by engaging questions of language and writing through a lineage of theoretical texts, including Frued, Kristeva, Irigaray, and Deleuze. e Th se texts aid the readers in seeing ways of conceptualizing gender and sexual identity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 35 – Jun 15, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/chinese-shakespeares-two-centuries-of-cultural-exchange-review-xS34VQ2wZ0
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

employ die ff rent manners of dealing with assimilation in the context of the domi- nating United States culture. Chapter 2 deals with the issue of bisexuliaty as a theme formed within Lesbi c fi tion, which is a category of lesbian c fi tion connoting female bisexuality. A pertinent feature of this section of Frohlich’s study is the use of the Rosamaría Roe ffi l’s novel Amora (1989), which challenges the incorporation of common, North American derived terminology for gays and lesbians, such as the term “gay,” into Mexican vernacular. Observing the novel’s commentary on this use of language, Frolich helps the reader see the way in which the work contests the commonalities of gay/lesbian/queer culture across national borders, calling this move by the author “a resistance to the assumed superiority of the United States and its ethos of identity politics that posits a universal model for all to follow” (72). Following this discussion Frolich continues to reveal the problematic of lesbian subjectivity by engaging questions of language and writing through a lineage of theoretical texts, including Frued, Kristeva, Irigaray, and Deleuze. e Th se texts aid the readers in seeing ways of conceptualizing gender and sexual identity

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jun 15, 2011

There are no references for this article.