Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Chicana/o Activism and Education: An Introduction to the Special Issue

Chicana/o Activism and Education: An Introduction to the Special Issue Luis Urrieta, Jr. University of Colorado, Boulder The Mexican American community has been involved in a struggle to improve the educational conditions of their children ever since the US invasion and continued occupation of Mexican territory (Gallegos, 2000). This struggle includes the successful litigation of court cases against segregation a decade prior to Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 (Moreno, 1999). But, perhaps the biggest event surrounding Education was during the early Chicana/o movimientos in the 1960s. An estimated 10,000 Chicana/o students walked out of classes on March 3, 1968 in East Los Angeles to protest the unequal conditions of their education (San Miguel, 1996; Solórzano and Delgado Bernal, 2001). Since then Chicana/o activism in Education has focused on the rights of Latina/o students, especially non-English speaking and migrant students and the right to bilingual education programs. Increased efforts to integrate Latina/o students, equal distribution of educational funding sources, and the constant struggle against alienating schooling practices such as tracking, standardized testing, the whitestream (Grande, 2000) curriculum, and access to higher education (Gándara, 1995) have also been important issues. This special issue of The High School Journal is dedicated to this struggle and legacy for social justice http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The High School Journal University of North Carolina Press

Chicana/o Activism and Education: An Introduction to the Special Issue

The High School Journal , Volume 87 (4) – Jul 4, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-north-carolina-press/chicana-o-activism-and-education-an-introduction-to-the-special-issue-0P8Q2rmYek
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-5157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Luis Urrieta, Jr. University of Colorado, Boulder The Mexican American community has been involved in a struggle to improve the educational conditions of their children ever since the US invasion and continued occupation of Mexican territory (Gallegos, 2000). This struggle includes the successful litigation of court cases against segregation a decade prior to Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 (Moreno, 1999). But, perhaps the biggest event surrounding Education was during the early Chicana/o movimientos in the 1960s. An estimated 10,000 Chicana/o students walked out of classes on March 3, 1968 in East Los Angeles to protest the unequal conditions of their education (San Miguel, 1996; Solórzano and Delgado Bernal, 2001). Since then Chicana/o activism in Education has focused on the rights of Latina/o students, especially non-English speaking and migrant students and the right to bilingual education programs. Increased efforts to integrate Latina/o students, equal distribution of educational funding sources, and the constant struggle against alienating schooling practices such as tracking, standardized testing, the whitestream (Grande, 2000) curriculum, and access to higher education (Gándara, 1995) have also been important issues. This special issue of The High School Journal is dedicated to this struggle and legacy for social justice

Journal

The High School JournalUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Jul 4, 2004

There are no references for this article.