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Charles Brockden Brown’s Lazaretto Chronotope Series: Secret History and “The Man at Home”

Charles Brockden Brown’s Lazaretto Chronotope Series: Secret History and “The Man at Home” joseph j. letter University of Tampa Charles Brockden Brown's Lazaretto Chronotope Series Secret History and "The Man at Home" My son, there's nothing insignificant in this whole world. But first and foremost is, among all earthly things, the time and place. --Friedrich Schiller, Wallenstein 2.I, 10­12 In the spring of 1798, just months before publishing six novels in less than three years, Charles Brockden Brown wrote "The Man at Home," a series of thirteen sketches that appeared in the Weekly Magazine. For the most part, "The Man at Home" has been dismissed as a minor and fragmentary work, a very loosely structured series of reflections on debt and property, where Brown first developed plotlines that later would be elaborated in the novels. But I believe the text holds much greater significance for understanding how Brown used serial publication as a performative vehicle. In effect, Brown uses the series to create unity through repetition and ultimately suggests a program of resistance to the condition of modern seriality. Through a literary motif that I will refer to as the "lazaretto chronotope series," Brown articulates an alternate space-time, one that gradually reveals links between the present and past. In other words, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early American Literature University of North Carolina Press

Charles Brockden Brown’s Lazaretto Chronotope Series: Secret History and “The Man at Home”

Early American Literature , Volume 50 (3) – Nov 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of North Carolina Press.
ISSN
1534-147X
Publisher site
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Abstract

joseph j. letter University of Tampa Charles Brockden Brown's Lazaretto Chronotope Series Secret History and "The Man at Home" My son, there's nothing insignificant in this whole world. But first and foremost is, among all earthly things, the time and place. --Friedrich Schiller, Wallenstein 2.I, 10­12 In the spring of 1798, just months before publishing six novels in less than three years, Charles Brockden Brown wrote "The Man at Home," a series of thirteen sketches that appeared in the Weekly Magazine. For the most part, "The Man at Home" has been dismissed as a minor and fragmentary work, a very loosely structured series of reflections on debt and property, where Brown first developed plotlines that later would be elaborated in the novels. But I believe the text holds much greater significance for understanding how Brown used serial publication as a performative vehicle. In effect, Brown uses the series to create unity through repetition and ultimately suggests a program of resistance to the condition of modern seriality. Through a literary motif that I will refer to as the "lazaretto chronotope series," Brown articulates an alternate space-time, one that gradually reveals links between the present and past. In other words,

Journal

Early American LiteratureUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 18, 2015

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