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Buffalo Gals

Buffalo Gals Fiction a s t o ry B y e la I ne ne I l o r r In her thirteenth year, the year she almost became popular in America, Alice learned some new words, or she learned some words newly. The first was bitch and it was unthinkable. No case could be made for comparing a woman to a dog. Still, the way the word was delivered--almost like spitting--Alice figured she would use it. The second word was damn, not like the large earth structure that held back water to create a reservoir for the African town of her birth, but like Hell damn. She would not allow goddamn into her consciousness. Hell was another word. She had already known it, of course, growing up steeped in the church. Alice might have said soaked in the church. Her parents were missionaries, for heaven's sake. But the girl did not know hell like this, as an attitude, not a place. Hence her new vocabulary and the meanings she possessed: Bitch was an insult. Damn was a threat. Hell was an attitude. Alice liked seeing what combinations she could create with the words. Hell damn bitch Damn bitch hell http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southern Cultures University of North Carolina Press

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Center for the Study of the American South. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1534-1488
Publisher site
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Abstract

Fiction a s t o ry B y e la I ne ne I l o r r In her thirteenth year, the year she almost became popular in America, Alice learned some new words, or she learned some words newly. The first was bitch and it was unthinkable. No case could be made for comparing a woman to a dog. Still, the way the word was delivered--almost like spitting--Alice figured she would use it. The second word was damn, not like the large earth structure that held back water to create a reservoir for the African town of her birth, but like Hell damn. She would not allow goddamn into her consciousness. Hell was another word. She had already known it, of course, growing up steeped in the church. Alice might have said soaked in the church. Her parents were missionaries, for heaven's sake. But the girl did not know hell like this, as an attitude, not a place. Hence her new vocabulary and the meanings she possessed: Bitch was an insult. Damn was a threat. Hell was an attitude. Alice liked seeing what combinations she could create with the words. Hell damn bitch Damn bitch hell

Journal

Southern CulturesUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Feb 13, 2008

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