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Brothers of a Vow: Secret Fraternal Orders and the Transformation of White Male Culture in Antebellum Virginia (review)

Brothers of a Vow: Secret Fraternal Orders and the Transformation of White Male Culture in... widespread northern conspiracy to subvert the law and "appeared to have completely changed the way they viewed the Union" (68). Barker might have pursued his analysis further and examined what role the southern press played in creating the perception of an antislavery groundswell in the North. For a work that promises to place Burns at its center, the author makes some curious choices. The final chapter, which examines Burns's life after he is finally freed, focuses exclusively on St. Catharines, Canada, where Burns lived for merely two years, offering a thirty-year social history of this remarkable fugitive slave community that serves primarily to depict St. Catharines as a true haven of racial equality. Nothing is said of Burns's attendance at Oberlin College (paid for by a white female abolitionist from Boston) or that town's dramatic defiance of the Fugitive Slave Act. One fears that Barker neglects Burns's five years in Ohio because it might weaken his claim that no rising tide of antislavery followed in the wake of the Burns trial. Concise and well written, The Imperfect Revolution offers a provocative, contrary view of the rendition of Anthony Burns that succeeds in demonstrating that the current standard is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Brothers of a Vow: Secret Fraternal Orders and the Transformation of White Male Culture in Antebellum Virginia (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 2 (2) – May 19, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
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2159-9807
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Abstract

widespread northern conspiracy to subvert the law and "appeared to have completely changed the way they viewed the Union" (68). Barker might have pursued his analysis further and examined what role the southern press played in creating the perception of an antislavery groundswell in the North. For a work that promises to place Burns at its center, the author makes some curious choices. The final chapter, which examines Burns's life after he is finally freed, focuses exclusively on St. Catharines, Canada, where Burns lived for merely two years, offering a thirty-year social history of this remarkable fugitive slave community that serves primarily to depict St. Catharines as a true haven of racial equality. Nothing is said of Burns's attendance at Oberlin College (paid for by a white female abolitionist from Boston) or that town's dramatic defiance of the Fugitive Slave Act. One fears that Barker neglects Burns's five years in Ohio because it might weaken his claim that no rising tide of antislavery followed in the wake of the Burns trial. Concise and well written, The Imperfect Revolution offers a provocative, contrary view of the rendition of Anthony Burns that succeeds in demonstrating that the current standard is

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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